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Full text of "Yearbook [Bridgewater State College]"

I 





"THEY GAVE THEIR HEARTS, THEIR MINDS, 
AND THEIR LIVES TO THIS SCHOOL." SEE 
THE DEDICATION PAGE AND FIND OUT TO 
WHOM THE 1989 YEARBOOK IS DEDICATED. 






LOOKING THROUGH THE OPENING 
SECTION, YOUR INITIAL IMPRESSION OF 
THE YEARBOOK SHOULD BE "WOW! THE 
OPENING SECTION SETS THE STANDARD 
FOR THE REST OF THE BOOK. 



14 



TABLE Of 
CONTENTS 




THE FRIENDLY SMILE AND THE 
HELPFULNESSS OF THE BSC FACULTY AND 
ADMINISTRATION MAKES AN IMPRESSION 
ON THE COLLEGE COMMUNITY. IN THE 
ACADEMICS SECTION, FIND OUT ABOUT 
THE CARING AND DEDICATED BSC 
PROFESSIONALS. 



88 



GETTING INVOLVED WAS THE TREND IN 
1989, CREATING A VASTLY DIFFERENT 
CLIMATE FOR BSC CLUBS AND 
ORGANIZATIONS. CHECK OUT THE RECORD 
NUMBERS OF STUDENTS WHO MADE THEIR 
MARK IN THE ORGANIZATIONS SECTION. 



EVERY DAY THERE IS A BSC ATHLETE READY 
TO GIVE IT 100%. BEING A BSC ATHLETE IS 
AN UNIQUE FEELING AND FIND OUT ALL 
ABOUT IT IN THE SPORTS SECTION. 



192 



SENIORS. THEY MADE THEIR FINAL MARK 
THIS YEAR AS THEY FINISHED FOUR YEARS 
OF HARD WORK TOWARD A COLLEGE 
DEGREE. TAKE A MOMENT AND FIND YOUR 
SPECIAL SENIOR FRIENDS IN THE SENIOR 
SECTION. 



242 



SOME THINGS NEVER CHANGE. THE SPIRIT 
TO MAKE THE MOST OF THE COLLEGE 
YEARS HAS NOT CHANGED. IN THE 
STUDENT LIFE SECTION, SEE HOW 
STUDENTS MADE THE MOST OF THEIR 
EXPERIENCE IN 1989. 




132 



BEING A GREEK WAS NOT ONLY IN VOGUE 
AT BSC BUT AT OTHER COLLEGES AND 
UNIVERSITIES. READ IN "GREEK" ABOUT 
THE NEW BROTHERS AND SISTERS THAT 
ARRIVED ON THE BSC CAMPUS. 



A NEW AND DIFFERENT CONCEPT WAS 
INTRODUCED IN LAST YEAR'S YEARBOOK — 
THE DIRECTORY. A LISTING OF ADDRESSES, 
THE DIRECTORY IS COMPILED FOR THOSE 
WHO WANT TO REMAIN IN TOUCH WITH 
THEIR FRIENDS. 



260 



LIVING IN THE RESIDENCES WAS A "NEW 
AND DIFFERENT" EXPERIENCE. LOOK IN 
THE RESIDENCES SECTION TO SEE HOW 
STUDENTS LIVED IN "A WORLD OF 
DIFFERENCE" AT BSC. 



FOR OVER 260 PAGES YOU HAVE SEEN THE 
NEW AND DIFFERENT CHANGES MADE AT 
BSC IN 1989. NOW 1989 IS OVER. AND SO IS 
THE YEARBOOK. 




URSA MAJOR noun (latin, gen. Ursac Majoris, lit. gre< 

that is the most conspicous of the northern constellations, is situated near the 

north pole of the heavens, and contains the stars forming the Big Dipper, two of 

which are in a line indicating the direction of the North Star — called also Great 

Bear. 

Webster's Ninth New Collegiate Dictionary, 1987. 



I 



I 



1 





Last year, 1988, was one of the most difficult years in the College's 
history. With the resignation of former President Gerard Indelicato 
and scandal that surrounded it, the college community was in an 
upheavel of intense emotions of resentment, anger, and shock as 
they tried sort out the truth from the fiction. Working long and hard, the 
college administrators and student leaders tried to help 
the College move forward. 

In trying to provide a sense of progress and advance- 
ment, the administration and student leaders realized 
that many changes needed to be made. Some changes 
were just evolutionary, but others were made so that last 
year could not be repeated. Many changes were made in 
policies, procedures, physical surroundings, personnel, 
and most notably, attitudes. 

The result was a "new and different" Bridgewater State College in 1989. 
Turn the pages and see all the changes that made an impression on 
Bridgewater during the year. . . 



NEW 

and 

DIFFERENT 




89 Ursae Majoris 

Volume 91 

Bridgewater State College 

Bridgewater, MA 02325 




Alma Mater 

Dedicated to Dr. Albert G. Boyden 

O loved Alma Mater we greet thee. 

Thy daughters and sons from afar. 

As often we pause on our toiling 

To hail thee, whose children we are. 

Alma Mater! Alma Mater! 

Safe for aye in memory's Shrine. 

Alma Mater! Alma Mater! 

Praise and love be ever thine. 

With strong, steady hand dost thou lead us. 

Thy powerful arm is our stay; 

Thy light is our beacon in darkness. 

Which ever will lend us its ray. 

Alma Mater! Alma Mater! 

Safe for aye in memory's Shrine. 

Alma Mater! Alma Mater! 

Praise and love be ever thine. 

Words by Zelma Lucas 04 
Music by Wm. Lester Bates '92 




N 



"They gave their hearts, their minds, and their lives to this 
school." 

Inscribed on a bronze tablet inside Boyden Hall, honoring 
Albert Gardner Boyden (Principal 1860-1906) and his son Arthur 
Clarke Boyden (Principal 1906-1931, President 1932). 

Last year saw the departure of three people who gave many 
years of dedicated service to the College. These three people 
are Dr. Robert Dillman, Actir\g President and former Vice 
President, Academic Affairs, and Mr. David Deep, Vice 
President, Student Services, and his wife, Mrs. Judith Deep, 
Director, Health Services. 



Under his leadership as Acting President, Dr. Robert Dillman 

guided the College through a difficult period of time in its 

history, providing a sense of progress and 

advancement. With his over 20 years of '^"" 

service to the College, we both regret his 

leaving and wish him continued success in , " 

his new position as President of Fairmont 

State College in West Virginia. 



In addition, the husband and wife team 
David and Judith Deep retired in 
December after many years of service to 
Bridgewater State College. We have been 
pleased to have known them and wish 
them an active and fulfilling retirement. 



^ ^ 




AS HONORARY PARADE MARSHALS OF THE HOME- 
COMING PARADE, MR. DAVID AND MRS. JUDITH DEEP 
WERE HONORED FOR THEIR YEARS OF DEDICATED 
SERVICE. 



It is with deep appreciation for their 

service to Bridgewater State College that we dedicate the 1989 Ursae 

Majoris Yearbook to Dr. Robert Dillman and Mr. David and Mrs. Judith 

Deep. 




N 



N 



PfEwAisD Different 



BRIDGEWATER STATE COLLEGE — Student activism is not dead. 
Students certainly proved that it was very much alive as student 
activism was the focus of things at Bridgewater State College in 1989. 

Faced with many issues that affected them, students voiced their 
opinions, demonstrating their concerns. A key issue that presented a 
challenge was the "deficit assessment fee" crisis, and provided the 
opportunity for students to band together and make the state and 
college leaders aware of their position. 

While the students were unable to erase the "deficit assessment fee", 
they had realized that they were successful in harnessing the collective 
voice of the students; something that had not been achieved in recent 
years. 

This accomplishment provided the catalyst the students needed to 
make other "new and different" changes. Students became more aware 
of their own power to create changes that needed to be made. 

As a result, a "new and different" Bridgewater State College 
emerged; a new Bridgewater that could move ahead more collectively 
and purposefully. 



BY RON RETT I 



'jm 





1 



PJ^ ^^WI^W' ^^m^^^^^ 



I 



# 



'?>J 






^. 



% 



^^ 





What's New? 

Mr. Denny Ciganovic 

Director, Career Planning and Placement 

leader, CREEd (Coalition for Responsibility of Ethics 

in Education) 



^ ^ We've had a renewed interest in what's happening — 
H H issues that have an impact on BSC — we're taking 

more intiative — students, we — are now challenging the 

things that need challenging," 



I N 



"NOI NOI" WAS THE RALLYINQ CRY 

not only at Bridgewater but at other colleges and 
universities across the state as students protested 
the "deficit assessment fee". 

FILM AT SIX AND ELEVEN 

Rallies at Bridgewater and across the state gained 
television exposure as students demonstrated their 
anger over "the deficit assessment fee". 

A CANDLELIGHT VIQIL 

for the victims of apartheid in South Africa was 
held after a lecture given by Mr. Jack Healey, the 
executive director of Amnesty International. 






New And Different 



ne oflme key changes in 1989 was attitudes, 
iln^cent years, student leaders as well as 
, ,^^_. st«lents themselves became frustrated at the 
^ tdcal apathy about many vital issues. 

However, things changed in 1989. Students were 
no|long^ passive but became vocal, demonstrating 
actively for causes that now concerned them deeply. 

\Al|n the state of Massachusetts in financial 
difficulty, the state leaders and college leaders sought 
a way out through putting a "deficit assessment fee" 
on our tuition bills. "NO! NO!" was the rallying cry 
not only at Bridgewater, but all across the state at 
other colleges and universities. Students' voices were 
beginning to be heard by the leaders who had been 
deaf to students' concerns for so long. 

Not only did Bridgewater students voice their 
opinions about the financial state of Massachusetts 
and its effect on them, they voiced their opinions in 
other areas as well. Organizations such as Amnesty 
International, Students for Life, and MassPIRG 
provided outlets for students to express their ideas 
and opinions about social and environmental issues. 

Students' attitude was different in 1989 as it was a 
year that challenged students to take an active part in 
determining courses of action affecting their college 
and world. ▼ 



ISewAisd Different 






.^ ^ Why Dother trying?" and "It won't make any 
difference whether I try or not" were among 
the many Reuses people gave last year for not 
getting involved. 

But tlJI year, all that changed. With the 
t^nenaous influence the students had in the "deficit 
assesAent fee" crisis, members of the college 
con^unity began to think that they could indeed 
make a difference in issues that concerned them. 

Students certainly seemed to be more involved in 
1989. Students came out of the woodwork and got 
involved in clubs and organizations, events, and/or 
issues. And it wasn't restricted to just students; 
faculty, staff, administration and alumni all got 
further involved at the college. 

Many student and college leaders welcomed this 
remarkable change in attitude regarding getting 
involved and making a difference. 

Through the involvement of its community 
members, Bridgewater State College became a "new 
and different" institution; an institution that could be 
counted upon to consider and also satisfy the needs 
of its members. ▼ 







te 



*j- 




What's New? 



Linda Dutra 

President, Student Alumni Relations Council 




A ^ 1989 brought so many hanges — and the best of all 
■ H was the increased involvement from everybody. 
Everybody from freshman to seniors are so much more en- 
thusiastic and involved." 



w 




LIVING ON-CANPUS 

24 hours a day allows many students to become 
more involved with campus clubs, organizations 
and activities. 

STUDENTS TOOK STEPS 

to get more involved on-campus. At the first ever 
Organizations Fair, clubs and organizations got the 
chance to show students the many opportunities to 
get involved. 

WELCOME BACK 

Many alumni return to college in order to get 
involved and give back to the college that has given 
them their degrees and the best years of their lives. 





What's New? 



Ms. Mela Dukta 
Director, Housing 



^ ^ We don't just provide a bed and a place to eat. We 
m m provide a place to learn and to grow. This is the 
philosophy behind the Housing Department. We're making 
many changes to improve the quality of living at our res- 
idences." 



I N 



BUILDINGS A AND B 

Without a name yet, these new dormitories are the 
newest additions to the campus buildings, sched- 
uled to open in September 1989. 

WORKING CLOSELY 

with the Resident Assistants, the Resident Direc- 
tors works hard to constantly improve the quality 
of life at the residences. Here is Ellen Cuttle, Res- 
ident Director of the Apartments. 

LIVING AT THE RESIDENCE HALLS 

provide many opportunities to make friendships 
that only last throughout the college years but 
throughtout a lifetime. 




10 






New And Different 



mone the many changes that occured in 1989, 
ResiJIntial Life had its share of changes. 

le new dorms, on site of old tennis courts 
n«rr Shea/Durgin Hall, began construction in 

Sne 198^ and during the course of the year, college 
mmunity could see rapid progress of the newest 
adiiiM to the college campus. The new dorms are 
sch^fied to open in September, 1989, on time for 
the n?w academic year 1989-90. 

Meal tickets became computerized as they were 
coded onto a magnetic strip on the back of the 
student id cards, faciliating easier access to the dining 
halls as well as increasing the options to include 
going the Sub Shop or the Commuter Cafeteria for 
meals. 

Also increased security measures were evident at all 
the dorms. Previously, only Shea/Durgin had a strict 
security program whereby the guest had to be signed 
in a log and had to drop off a photo id which was 
returned when the guest left the building. The other 
dorms required only that the guests be accompanied 
by a resident at all times. 

The new measures required that guests be stamped 
at all the dorms, and Shea/Durgin required, in 
addition to the former policy of signing in and 
leaving a photo id, to carry a residence hall pass. 

Many changes were made in residence hall life, 
and they definitely improved the quality of life of 
living on campus at Bridge water State College. T 



i-**i 



11 



I 





What's New? 



Ms. Sherri Noyes 

Treasuer, Student Government Association 



^ ^ Student Involvement. Because of their new concern of 

H H what happens to them and BSC, the future looks great. 

Their involvement will help form the basis for a new and 

different relationship between the students, administration 

and the new president." 



I N 



I 



AT COMMENCEMENT 

Jane Donovan of the Campus Center Director's 
Office congratulates Gerry LaBelle. Many of the 
college's faculty, staff and administration form 
close friendships with students. 

AS GRADUATES 

of Bridgewater State College, many alumni have a 
altered relatiionship with their alma mater. Many 
alumni get involved, and Mr. Ralph Fletcher is an 
excellent example. He is on the College's Board of 
Trustees and is an Alumni Association officer. 

STORMING BOYDEN HALL 

students at a protest rally went to the President's 
Office, demanding answers. Dr. Adrian Rondileau, 
because of his unique relationship with the stu- 
dents, eased the student's fear and explained the 
fiscal crisis to them. 




12 






ISewAnd Different 



Becauae of the changes in students' attitude 
and^heir willingness to get involved, their 
r^tionship with the college administration 
had changed. 

Studgfits were no longer willing to simply just 
^ceptjRoctrine put down from the Boyden Hall; they 
w^r^uestioning the various policies, procedures, and 
prc^ams that would affect them tremendously. 

Students looked for meaningful dialogue that 
would result in mutual agreement and solutions to 
the problems that both the students and 
administration faced. 

However, in the "deficit assessment fee" crisis, 
students became aware that a meaningful dialogue 
didn't exist between them and the administration. 
They sought through their intense vocal 
demonstrations to make the college leaders aware 
that students wanted to be heard. 

As a result, students' voices began to be heard, and 
a change in the relationship between the students and 
administration began to take place. Because of this 
change, Bridgewater State College can move forward 
with a more positive future. 

Take a look in the next 260 pages and see the "new 
and different" Bridgewater State College. . . 



13 





o matter what "new and different" changes were made at Bridgewater State 
College, some things never change — like the student life at BSC. Everyone was 
constantly getting involved in the "happenings" on campus whether it be formal 
or casual. Everyone somehow knew that years spent at Bridgewater are the best 
ones, and they were making the most of every minute at BSC. Flip through the 
pages and find out where everyone was in 1989 . . . 



14 



STUDENT LIFE 




NEW 

and 

DIFFERENT 



Nanci Burgio 

student Life Editor 









15 






tudent Life 



R 



V 



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▼ ▼▼ 



II 

■■ o matter how many "new and different" changes are made at Bridgewater 
B" State College, some things never change. Everyday, every semester, there 
is some sort of event or activity going on. Ranging from the formal to the casual, 
from intriguing faculty and celebrity guest speakers to the zany Club Sodas and 
zillion dances, the programs that are put on satisfy the many diverse interests of 
the students that attend BSC. Many of the events are steeped in Bridgewater 
tradition such as Convocation, Homecoming, Spring Ball, and Commencement. 
Others are "new" traditions such as the annual Beach Party and the Suitcase 
Dance. No matter the event — traditional or new and different — the spirit 
never changes. Bridgewater students have always had the "spirit" to make the 
most of their college experience. Turn the pages and see how they made the 
most of their collegiate experience in 1989 . . . 




16 



T 



ULE OF CONTENTS 



DURING THE COURSE OF THE YEAR, OVER SEVERAL 
HUNDRED EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES ARE HELD AT 
BRIDGEWATER STATE COLLEGE. TO SHOW THEM ALL 
HERE IN THE YEARBOOK WOULD BE ALMOST NEXT TO 
IMPOSSIBLE. IN THE FOLLOWING STUDENT LIFE 
SECTION REPRESENTS SOME OF THE MAJOR EVENTS 
THAT HAPPENED AT BRIDGEWATER STATE COLLEGE 
IN 1989. BELOW IS AN INDEX OF EVENTS THAT WAS 
INCLUDED IN THIS YEAR'S STUDENT LIFE SECTION. 





FALL CONCERT ► 18 

On Thursday, September 15, BSC stu- 
dents got together to enjoy the sounds 
of the Cape Cod Travellin' All-Star 
Band at the Fall Concert, sponsored 
by the Program Committee. 

CONVOCATION ► 20 

The formal opening of the academic 
year was the Convocation Exercises, 
held on Wednesday, September 28, as 
members of the Class of 1989 and 
college faculty and administration 
joined together to set the tone for the 
upcoming year. 

HOMECOMING ► 22 

Homecoming is one of the biggest 
weekends of the year, and this year's 
celebration on October 14-15 was no 
exception. Throngs of alumni re- 
turned on campus to celebrate Home- 
coming along with the current stu- 
dents. 




WINTER GRADUATION ► 28 

In February 1987, the first Winter 
Commencement was held for those 
students who completed their course 
work during the previous summer or 
fall sessions. This year's Winter Grad- 
uation was held on Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 1. 

BEACH PARTY ► 30 

On Saturday, April 1, BSC students 
chased away those winter blahs by 
joining in the fun and the sun at the 
third annual Beach Party, sponsored 
by the Program Committee. 

SUITCASE DANCE ► 32 

Many students caught the suspense of 
the Suitcase Dance on Thursday, 
April 20, as they waited to find out if 
they had won the trip to sunny' Ft. 
Lauderdale. 

SPRING CONCERT ► 34 

Excited BSC students waited all week 
with anticipation 'til 'til Tuesday ar- 
rived on the campus for the Spring 
Outdoor Concert in May. 



SPRING BALL ► 36 

At the Sheraton-Tara Braintree, the 
biggest social event of the year was 
the Spring Ball held on the last day of 
classes, Tuesday, May 16. 

SENIOR WEEK ► 40 

With days away before graduation, 
the Class of 1989 celebrated their last 
days as "seniors" during the exciting 
. agenda of Senior Week activities. 

COMMENCEMENT ► 42 

For four years, the Class of 1989 had 
waited for Saturday, May 27 to arrive 
and when it did, they celebrated their 
Commencement with pomp and cir- 
cumstance. 



17 





Enjoy the beantiful sounds 
at the Ontdoor Fall Concert. 

STUDENTLIFE 



A DANCIN' THE DAY AWAY AT THE FALL CONCERT. 
SOAKIN' UP SOME SUN AT THE CONCERT WAS THIS 
GROUP OF SIGMA CHI BROTHERS. 




▲ ► MAIN AHRACTION AT THE OUTSIDE FALL CONCERT 
WAS "CAPE COD TRAVELLIN' ALL-STARS". 

► MIKE WALLACE AND JORGE NEVES ENJOY THEM- 
SELVES AT THE FALL CONCERT. 



18 



< TAKING A MOMENT TO REST IN THE SHADE AT THE 
FALL CONCERT. 




or the past three years. Mother Nature has not 

cooperated with the Campus Center Program 
Committee. Both their Fall and Spring Concerts during 
the past three years have been moved indoors into the 
Commuter Cafeteria or the Campus Center Audito- 
rium due to inclement weather. This year, however, 
the weather finally cooperated and this year's Fall 
Concert on Thursday, September 15th, was held out- 
doors behind the Campus Center. The featured band 
was the Cape Cod Travellin' All-Star Band. The band's 
performance proved popular with the Bridgewater 

State College students as they came back for an encore performance in the 
Rathskellar during the spring semester. The Fall Concert provided the opportunity 
for students to get together to relax and have good time and the opportunity to 
welcome back each other to school. 

Pamela Grimes 




A NOW THAT THEY HAVE THEIR BALLOONS, THESE 
WOMEN ARE ALL SMILES AT THE FALL CONCERT. 

< IN THE COLD AUTUMN WIND, THESE BSC STU- 
DENTS ARE ENJOYING THE MUSIC OF THE "CAPE 
COD TRAVELLIN' ALL-STARS". 



19 



► TAKING A BREATHER AT CONVOCATION RECEPTION 
ARE CLASS OF '89 SENIORS JOE MUCCI, DAN O'BRIEN, 
AND CHRIS CORBEH. 





A 



ccording to the College Catalog, "Convocation 
is formal opening of the the Academic Year 
and takes place in mid-September. Faculty and 
members of the Senior Class don academic rodes 
for a colorful procession to the ceremonies, and it is 
customary to invite an outstanding graduate of the 
College to return to deliver the Convocation ad- 
dress." 

Mayor Carl D. Pitaro of Brockton, Class of 1960, 

presented this year's Convocation address on 

Wednesday September 28th. Pitaro began address 

by asking the senior class what their reaction was going to be, upon walking out 

into the world and saying, "We're ready!" 

"Ready for what?" he asked. To "settle for the status quo " or to "challenge 
the inequities and failures" of the world? 

Pitaro stressed in his address the importance of striving to improve life, even 



▲ HAMMING IT UP WITH THE MARSHAL'S BATONS 
ARE RON PEHIT, ELLEN CUHLE, PAM KENNY, AND 
JORGE NEVES. 

► WITH ACTING PRESIDENT ADRIAN RONDILEAU 
AT THE CONVOCATION RECEPTION IS MRS. AND 
MR. CARL PITARO. WHO WAS THE CONVOCATION 
SPEAKER. 

► ► GAMMA PHI BETA SORORITY SISTERS 
BARBIE DANIELS, KAREN COONS, BETH BERTUCCI, 
AND FELICIA SALSER GET TOGETHER AT THE CON- 
VOCATION RECEPTION. 




20 





E 



xperience tke Pomp and Ceremony 
of tke Convocation Exercises. 

STUDENTLIFE 



if only a little bit, and even if only for one person. He 
referred to the book When Bad Things Happen to Good 
People by Harold S. Kushner to illustrate his point. 

The example Pitaro used was the story of a boy who 
came upon another child sitting on the curb, crying 
over a broken tricycle. Unable to help fix the tricycle, 
the boy did the best he could: "I sat down and helped 
him cry." 

In closing, he put forth the challenge to the senior 
class to remember the words of Longfellow and strive 
to leave their "footprints in the sand." 

Other college leaders addressed the Convocation 
audience, including Acting President Adrian 
Rondileau; Edward Nicoletti, president of the Class of 
1989; and SGA President Marcia Medeiros. 

Ron Pettit 





▲ A STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION PRES- 
IDENT MARCIA MEDEIROS PRESENTS HER ADDRESS, 
OUTLINING SGA'S PLANS FOR THE UPCOMING YEAR. 

▲ FACULTY ALSO HELP TO CELEBRATE THE FORMAL 
OPENING OF THE ACADEMIC YEAR. HERE ARE JACK 
JONES OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT; CLIFFORD 
WOOD, PRESIDENT OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
AND CHAIRMAN OF THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT; AND 
DR. SUSAN HOLTON, CHAIRPERSON OF THE COM- 
MUNICATION DEPARTMENT. 

<4 ROOMMATES CLARE CAHILL AND CINDY LEONARD 
TAKE A MOMENT TO LOOK FORWARD TO THEIR EX- 
CITING SENIOR YEAR. 

< < FAMILY AND FRIENDS ALSO COME TO HELP 
CELEBRATE CONVOCATION WITH CLASS OF 1989 
SENIORS. HERE IS SENIOR CLASS PRESIDENT ED- 
WARD NICOLETTI WITH HIS GODCHILD REBECCA 
NICOLEni AND HIS FAMILY. 



21 




I 




iplore the Colorful Pagentry 
of Homecoming '88. 

STUDENTLIF 



■:3S 



A ENJOYING THEMSELVES AT THE TAILGATING PARTIES 
IN THE PARKING LOT NEXT TO SWENSON FIELD DURING 
THE 1988 HOMECOMING GAME. 



H 




omecoming Weekend is a major event each October when large numbers of alumni 
return to the campus and join the current students to attend the annual Home- 
coming football game and many other activities which take place beginning Friday 
evening before the game. Besides the annual autumn football contest which highlights 
Homecoming, there are concerts, dinners, a parade, and other special events. 

College Catalogue 

According to Phil Conroy, director of alumni relations, "Homecoming is the 
largest alumni event each year". With over 5,000 alumni who descend on campus 
to join the festivities. Homecoming Weekend surpasses Alumni Day which is held 
each May. 

The Homecoming Committee was the group of people responsible for planning 
and putting on the biggest weekend of the year on October 14-15. The committee 
was composed of students, alumni, and administration and was chaired by the 
SGA Vice President Dave White. 

Homecoming Weekend began on Friday with a Boston Harbor Cruise, the 

Continued on Page 25 



A AT THE SIGMA CHI TAILGATING PARTY. A SIG BROTHER 
COOKS SOME HOTDOGS FOR HIS BROTHERS AND THEIR 
GUESTS DURING THE HOMECOMING CELEBRATION. 

► MEMBERS OF THE AFRO-AMERICAN SOCIETY WOW IT 
UP DURING THE HOMECOMING PARADE. AFRO-AMERICAN 
SOCIETY IS ONE OF THE OLDEST ORGANIZATIONS ON 
CAMPUS. 




22 



M "STRIVING FOR SOME FUN" WAS THE GOAL OF THIS 
BSC STUDENT AS HE RELAXES IN A JEEP DURING THE 
TAILGATING PARTIES AT THE HOMECOMING FOOTBALL 
GAME. 




' ^/^./M'^' 




▲ <4 THE BEARS SCORE ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL 
PLAY DURING THE HOMECOMING FOOTBALL 
GAME. THE BEARS WON THE GAME 24-13 OVER 
THE FRAMINGHAM STATE COLLEGE RAMS. 

A A NEW BEARS FAN, PERHAPS? BSC ADMIN- 
ISTRATION, STAFF AND FACULTY BRING THEIR 
FAMILIES TO TAKE PART IN THE HOMECOMING 
CELEBRATION. HERE THE BSC BEAR TAKES TIME 
TO VISIT WITH FELLOW BEARS FANS. 

< "SOME OF US HAVE TO WORK. YOU KNOW." 
SOME BSC STUDENTS HELPED TO RUN THE RE- 
FRESHMENT STAND, PROVIDING FANS WITH NON- 
ALCOHOLIC DRINKS TO QUENCH THEIR THIRST 
AFTER CHEERING THE BEARS ON THE FIELD. 




23 



► HOMECOMING IS ALSO A TIME FOR BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE STUDENTS TO INVITE THEIR PARENTS 
TO THE CAMPUS DURING ONE OF BIGGEST CELEBRA- 
TIONS OF THE YEAR, HOMECOMING. 





A ONCE AGAIN, THE TAILGATING PARTIES IS THE 
HIGHLIGHT OF THE HOMECOMING WEEKEND CEL- 
BRATION - A TIME WHERE CURRENT BSC STU- 
DENTS AND ALUMNI CAN GET TOGETHER FOR ONE 
BIG PARTY! 

A ► A FUTURE BSC STUDENT? MANY PARENTS 
FROM THE TOWN OF BRIDGEWATER BRING THEIR 
CHILDREN TO WATCH THE COLORFUL PROCES- 
SION OF THE HOMECOMING PARADE, PUT TO- 
GETHER BY THE STUDENTS OF BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE. 

► TWO BROTHERS OF THE NEWEST NATIONAL 
FRATERNITY ON CAMPUS, SIGMA PI, SLUG IT OUT 
ON THEIR FLOAT IN THE HOMCOMING PARADE 
WHICH DEPICTED VARIOUS OLYMPIC SPORTS 



> I 



:■»! 






24 





iplore the Colorful Paoentry 
of Homecoming '88. 

STUDENTLIF 



Continued from Page 22 

annual Bonfire Pep Relly sponsored by Sigma Chi, and 
a dinner meeting for the Alumni Association. 

Later that night began the long night of building of 
the floats for Saturday's parade behind Harrington 
Hall. 

Twenty clubs and organizations submitted entries 
the Homecoming Parade competition. Float entries 
had to conform to the Homecoming theme, "Striving 
for the Gold", and evey club and organization had 
different and creative interpretation of the theme. 
Winners of the parade competition would be an- 
nounced at halftime at the football game. 

On Saturday morning at 12:00 noon, the parade 

began at Harrington Hall, the site of the float building, 

and went around the Quadrangle to the front of the 

Art Building where the judges were situated. The 

Continued on Page 26 





▲ ▲ MEMBERS OF THE BSC FOOTBALL CHEERLEADING 
SQUAD RIDE ON THEIR FLOAT IN THE HOMECOMING 
PARADE. THE CHEERLEADERS WORK HARD TO BRING 
SPIRIT TO THE ALL THE HOME AND AWAY GAMES BY 
PRACTICING THEIR ROUTINES ALMOST DAILY. 

▲ LET'S HAVE A COOKOUT! A PART OF THE HOMECOMING 
TRADITION HERE AT BRIDGEWATER STATE COLLEGE IS 
THE FESTIVE ATMOSPHERE OF THE TAILGATING BEFORE, 
DURING, AND AFTER THE HOMECOMING FOOTBALL GAME. 

^ ALL SMILES AT THE SWENSON FIELD DURING THE 
HOMECOMING TAILGATING PARTIES. 



25 





▲ TRACEY ARMSTRONG AND FRIEND HAVE SOME FUN 
DURING, YOU GUESSED IT, THE HOMECOMING TAILGAT- 
ING PARTIES. 




▲ IN FRONT OF THE STANDS, THE BSC BEAR WORKS TO 
RALLY THE BRIDGEWATER FANS TO CHEER THE BEARS 
FOOTBALL TEAM ON TO VICTORY. 

► "WE LOVE A PARADE!" THE INTERNATIONAL CLUB 
SHOW THEIR CONTAGIOUS ENTHUSIASM TO THE JUDGES 
AS THEY COMPETE FOR THE "BEST FLOAT" TROPHY OF 
THE HOMECOMING PARADE. 



iplore tke Colorful Pagentry 
of Homecoming '88. 

TUDENTLIF 



E 



Continued from Page 25 

parade then continued on through the town of Bridgewater and then proceeded 
on to Swenson Field where it ended. Many specators agreed that this was the 
best parade ever. 

Just as the parade ended, the big football contest began at 1:00 p.m. The 
Bridgewater Bears were victorious as they conquered the Framingham State 
College Rams 24-13. They had vocal support from the their fans. 

During halftime, the winners of the Homecoming King and Queen title were 
announced. The honors went to seniors Jim Thomson and Denise Adamian. 

Also at halftime, winners of the Homecoming Parade competition were 
announced. Phi Pi Delta won first place. Student Government Association won 
second place and third place was won by Alpha Eta Rho. 

The Homecoming festivities came to a close that evening with the dance held 
in the Campus Center Ballroom. 

Once again Homecoming Weekdend was the highlight of the fall seemster 
and left many students and alumni with fond memories of a weekend that was 
full of fun and celebration. A weekend that was pure "gold". 

Ron Pettit 




26 



M MEMBERS OF THE ALPHA ETA RHO FRATERNITY SHOW 
THEIR "FLYING HIGH" SPIRIT DURING SATURDAY'S 
HOMECOMING PARADE. THEY WON THIRD PLACE IN THE 
BEST FLOAT COMPETITION. 





A ^ A GREAT VIEW OF THE COLORFUL PRO- 
CESSION OF THE HOMECOMING PARADE COMING 
DOWN PLYMOUTH STREET IN BRIDGEWATER TO- 
WARD SWENSON FIELD, THE SITE OF THE DAY'S 
BBIG GAME. 

A ANOTHER GROUP OF GUYS ENJOY THEMSELVES 
DURING THE HOMECOMING TAILGATING PARTIES. 
THIS YEAR'S HOMECOMING WAS AHENDED BY 
RECORD SEniNG CROWNDS OF BSC STUDENTS, 
ALUMNI, ADMINISTRATION, STAFF AND FACULTY. 

< < MRS. MILLERICK AND HER DAUGHTER, ASH- 
LEY, ENJOY THE FESTIVITIES OF HOMECOMING 
WEEKEND. MRS. MILLERICK '82, AND HER HUS- 
BAND, MR. TIMOTHY MILLERICK '82, ARE ALUMNI 
AND TIM IS A STAFF ASSISTANT IN THE HOUSING 
DEPARTMENT. 

< PROGRAM COMMIHEE MEMBERS LUANN KENT 
AND PAM SWEENEY GATHER SOME BALLOONS 
FOR THEIR FLOAT IN THE HOMECOMING PARADE. 
PAM SWEENEY WAS THE VICE PRESIDENT OF THE 
PROGRAM COMMIHEE AND THE CHAIRPERSON 
OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS. 



27 



► THE CLASS OF 1989 GRADUATES AT THE WINTER 
COMMENCEMENT TAKE A MOMENT TO APPLAUD THEM- 
SELVES JUST AFTER THEY CHANGED TASSELS, SIGNI- 
FYING THEIR NEW STATUS AS GRADUATES OF BRIDGE- 
WATER STATE COLLEGE. 




▲ SHAKING HANDS WITH ACTING PRESIDENT 
RONDILEAU, AN EXCITED SENIOR WALKS ACROSS 
THE STAGE TO RECEIVE HER LONG AWAITED DI- 
PLOMA. 

▲ ► MEMBERS OF CHAMBERS SINGERS PER- 
FORMED A REPORTORIE OF SONGS FOR THEIR 
AUDIENCE WHICH INCLUDED THE GRADUATING 
MEMBERS OF THE CUSS OF 1989 AND THEIR 
PARENTS, FAMILIES, AND FRIENDS. 

► MR. A. THEODORE WELTE, PRESIDENT OF THE 
METRO SOUTH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, DELIV- 
ERED THIS YEAR'S WINTER COMMENCEMENT AD- 
DRESS. 

► ► ACTING PRESIDENT ADRIAN RONDILEAU DE- 
LIVERED A PERSONAL MESSAGE TO THE GRAD- 
UATING CUSS OF 1989. DUE TO RETIRE IN JULY 
1989 (FOR THE SECOND TIME), DR. RONDILEAU 
PRESIDED OVER HIS FIRST AND ONLY WINTER 
COMMENCEMENT. 




28 




E 



xperience Pomp and Circumstance 
of Winter Graduation 1989. 

STUDENTLIFE 



On February 1, 1989, the Third Winter Commence- 
ment was held in the Campus Center Auditorium, 
and 405 bachelors and 100 graduate degrees were 
presented. Several hundred people who could not be 
accommodated in the auditorium had to the view the 
ceremony by watching monitors set up in the Campus 
Center Ballroom and the Maxwell Library. "This was 
the first time we've done a remote broadcast of grad- 
uation," said Dr. Glenn Cook, director of Media Serv- 
ices. Commencement speaker Mr. Welte mentioned 
BSC's "rich history and proud heritage and also its 
growth, progess and integrity." and concluded by say- 
ing "strive for excellence in all that you do." 

Neil Burns 





A A STUDENT SPEAKER JANE LEMENAGER SPOKE TO 
HER FELLOW SENIORS ABOUT ANNOYANCES OF REG- 
ISTRATION, DROP-ADD, TILLY FOOD, AND OF THE JOY OF 
GEniNG THE DIPLOMA AND CROSSING OVER FROM STU- 
DENT TO ALUMNIHOOD. 

A A GRADUATING SENIOR FINALLY RECEIVES HIS LONG 
AWAITED DIPLOMA FROM MR. RALPH FLETCHER, A MEM- 
BER OF THE COLLEGE'S BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

-4 ^ IN THE COMMUTER CAFETERIA, TWO MEMBERS OF 
THE COLLEGE'S ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY TAKE A 
MOMENT TO TALK JUST PRIOR TO THE START OF THE 
COMMENCEMENT PROCESSION TO THE AUDITORIUM. 

M WAITING ANXIOUSLY FOR THE PROCESSION TO BEGIN, 
THESE MEMBERS OF THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1989 
MAKE SOME FINAL ADJUSTMENTS ON THEIR CAPS AND 
GOWNS. 



29 





atch tke fun and sun during 
the Third Annuai Beach Party! 

TUDENTLIFE 





▲ ▲ SPLISH' SPLASHIN' IN THE POOL ARE KIM EWERS 
AND HER FRIEND AS THEY ENJOY THEMSELVES IN THE 
THIRD ANNUAL BEACH PARTY. 

▲ DIANA SULLIVAN GETS A KISS! THE BEACH PARTY 
PROVIDED A PLACE TO CHASE AWAY THOSE WINTER 
BLAHS AND HAVE SOME FUN, FUN, FUN! 

► DANCIN' THE NIGHT AWAY! THE BEACH PARTY PRO- 
VIDED FRENTIC DANCING ALL NIGHT ALONG FOR ITS 
GUESTS WHO CAME TO FROLIC UNDERNEATH BRIGHT 
ORANGE SUN-LAMPS IN THE COMMUTER CAFETERIA. 

► ► WE WANT YOU . . . TO PLAY MINATURE GOLF! THE 
BEACH PARTY PROVIDED AN ENDLESS LIST OF THINGS TO 
DO FROM MINIATURE GOLF TO TWISTER AND SWIMMING 
TO EATING HAGZEN DAAS ICE-CREAM. 



Where else in mid-March would you find sand, 
swimming pools, beach balls, and 400 people in 
multi-colored jams — all looking for fun? 

In the Commuter Cafeteria, of course! But only | 
during the third annual Beach Party, sponsored by the 
Campus Center Program Committee. 

Plying the college circuit, Ray Boston's Beach Party 
arrived in Bridgewater to provide a lively assortment 
of music ranging from "We're Having a Party" to 
"Surfin' USA". 

Students took advantage of all that the Beach Party 
had to offer, including lying around in lounge chairs in 
the sandy beach area, splashing and dancing in the 
pools, and twisting on the dance floor. Yep, it was 
"Surfin' BSC". 

Ron Pettit 




30 




M WONDERING WHERE THE BOYS ARE IN 1989? AT 
BRIDGEWATER STATE COLLEGE'S BEACH PARTY, OF 
COURSE! 




A < FRAT MEMBERS OF BRIDGEWATER'S NEWEST 
FRATERNITY, THETA CHI, AND THEIR FRIEND EN- 
JOY ONE OF MANY RAY BOSTON'S "INTERESTING" 
SONGS. 

▲ THE DANCE FLOOR REMAINED HOT ALL NIGHT 
LONG AS THE GUESTS OF THE BEACH PARTY CON- 
TINUED TO BOOGIE AND TWIST THE NIGHT AWAY. 

M M SUMMERTIME. ANYTIME. NOW AT THE BEACH 
PARTY. THE FEELING OF SAND UNDERNEATH 
THEIR FEET AND THE SMELL OF COCONUT SUNTAN 
LOTION CAME A LIHLE EARLY FOR BSC. 

< "WE'RE TANNED." SURE. EVERYONE LOOKS TAN 
UNDERNEATH THOSE BRIGHT ORANGE SUNLAMPS 
AT THE BEACH PARTY. 



31 




i ▲ TWO MEMBERS OF THE STUDENT ALUMNI RE- 
LATIONS COUNCIL DISCUSS UST MINUTE AR- 
RANGEMENTS FOR THE DANCE, THE ONE OF THE 

I CLUB'S BIGGEST EVENTS OF THE YEAR. 

▲ ► MEMBERS OF THE SARC TAKE TURNS MAN- 
I NING THE TICKET TABLE FOR THE EVENT, AL- 
' LOWING EVERYONE TO ENJOY THEMSELVES AT 

THE DANCE. 

I ► THE GUESTS' EXCITMENT FOR THE SUITCASE 
I DANCE COULD NOT STAY JUST IN THE BALLROOM 
f - IT SPILLED OVER INTO THE BALLROOM FOYER 
AS GUESTS CONTINUED TO HAVE A GOOD TIME. 





latch the Thrill of the Anticipation 
and Suspense of the Suitcase Dance. 

STUDENTLIFE 



One of the most successful events from last year, 
the Suitcase Dance, was brought back by Student 
Alumni Relations Council and provided another 
evening of anticipation and suspense for its guests. 

To be eligible to win the grand prize, a weekend 
getaway to Ft. Lauderdale, all one had to do was bring 
a packed suitcase, dance for a long while, and pray. 
This year's winner who had her prayers answered was 
senior Alisa Safley who took her friend Monique 
Boudreau along to sunny Florida. 

Because the dance was scheduled later in the spring, 
this year's event had a lower turnout than last year's 
sold out event. SARC, who was overwhelmed by last 
year's success and made it an annual event, plans 
schedule next year's Suitcase Dance earlier in the 
spring semester. 

Ron Pettit 






▲ A "MOMMY, I'M GOING TO FLORIDA! " THE EXCITED 
WINNER, ALISA SAFLEY, WIPES A FEW TEARS OF JOY AS 
SHE TELLS HER MOTHER THAT SHE WON THE GRAND 
PRIZE, A WEEKEND IN FT. LAUDERDALE, OF THE SUITCASE 
DANCE. 

▲ AWAITING FOR THE BIG MOMENT WITH FINGERS 
CROSSED ARE THESE ENTHUSIASTIC GUESTS OF THE 
SUITCASE DANCE. 

< M SUSPENSE FILLS THE ROOM EVERYONE WAITS TO 
HEAR SARC PRESIDENT LINDA OUTRA ANNOUNCE THE 
WINNER OF THE WEEKEND GETAWAY TO SUNNY FT. 
LAUDERALE. 

< ALTHOUGH NOT WINNERS OF THE GRAND PRIZE, THIS 
COUPLE TAKES A FINAL TWIRL ON THE DANCE FLOOR, 
ENDING AN EXCITING NIGHT FOR ALL THOSE WHO AT- 
TENDED SUITCASE DANCE '89. 



33 




34 





Don't wait 'til next year 
to see 'til Tuesday! 

STUDENTLI 



P 

■ ■ SC fans of 'til Tuesday didn't have to wait 'til next 
MM year to see their favorite band. They were for- 
tunate to see them this year at the annual Spring 
Concert, sponsored by the Program Committee. 

Held at the tennis courts behind the Campus Center, 
this year's Spring Concert was a "big deal". Featuring 
a nationally known band, elaborate arrangements had 
to be made and implemented and eventually helped to 
make things run smoothly. 

This was 'til Tuesday's second visit to BSC — the 
first time was in 1985 for a "Metro Night", also spon- 
sored by the Program Committee. 

'til Tuesday provided their BSC fans with a mix of 
old and new material, saving the best for last as they 
ended with their number one hit, "Voices Carry" 

Ron Pettit 



* 





35 




s 



hare the Romance of the Sprino Ball, 
the Blgoest Social Event of the Year. 

STUDENTLIFE 







NCE UPON A TIME, in the far away land of 
Bridgewater, there was an annual tradition — the 
Spring Ball. Everyone in the land anxiously looked 
forward to a magical night at the Castle Sheraton Tara 
in the neighboring land of Braintree. 

All the princes and their princesses donned their 
luxurious evening clothes and set off in their carriages 
to the Braintree. They arrived at the Castle and danced 
all night, and the clock struck midnight (this is not 
Cinderella), the Spring Ball was over but for many, the 
magic went on until dawn. 

"The Magic. The Romance. The Tradition." These 
were all words used to describe the Spring Ball, held 
on the last day of classes, Tuesday, May 16th, which 
for many, was a "fairy tale". 

As the biggest social event of the year, everyone 

Continued on Page 38 





b 



37 





hare the Romance of the Spring Ball, 
the Biggest Social Event of the Year. 

STUDENTLIFE 



Continued from Page 37 

looked forward to the Ball. No other night or event 
could match what the Ball had to offer. As one of the 
few Bridgewater traditions that has been preserved, 
the Spring Ball was the one special night that they 
could spend with their special boyfriend or girlfriend 
and all their close friends. 

The Class of 1990 Officers coordinated this years' 
extravangza. Junior Class Vice-President Sheryl Bar- 
tley said, "This year's Ball was terrific. We didn't hear 
any complaints at all. Everyone had great time!" Un- 
like previous years, there were no complaints about 
the event itself such as the facilities, the entertainment 
or the food. 

For everyone who attended Spring Ball '89, it was 
truly a "fairy tale" which provided magical memories 
of a very special night in May. 

Ron Pettit 






^ 




38 




39 




'^" 


»>, 


r 




•> 

i 


i 



40 



■^^'•■^ ■^^ 





ee How Class of 1989 Celebrated 
Tkeir Last Days as "Seniors"! 

STUDENTLIFE 



#. 






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w^^^ *^ V- #- 




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^ .-« 



The Class of 1989 celebrated their last days during the 
Senior Week activities — an exciting agenda put 
together by the Senior Class Officers for their fellow 
classmates. 

On Wednesday, May 17, was the Hawaiian Luau. 
Underneath the red and white tent behind the Gym, 
seniors had an all-you-can-eat buffet including a roasted 
pig as well as entertainment by the Blowouts. 

Next was the Boston Harbor Cruise on Friday, May 19. 
A well-attended event, the Harbor Cruise provided a 
totally different setting for partying. 

On Tuesday, May 23 was sold-out Senior Nite at the 
Rat with the McMurphys. With graduation only days 
away. Seniors partied just as hard as they had worked for 
the past four years. 

Ending Senior Week was the Senior Dinner Dance, 
held the night before graduation on Friday, May 26. A 
semi-formal event, the Dinner Dance was held at the 
Canoe Club. Afterwards, the Seniors had a midnight 
brunch at Tilly. 





41 






elekrate Commencement 1989 
witk Pomp and Circnmstance! 

TUDENTLIFE 



▲ ▲ "HI MOM AND DAD AND EVERYONE ELSEI" GRAD- 
UATION IS A MOMENT TO SAY THANK YOU TO EVERYONE 
FOR ALL THEIR LOVE AND SUPPORT THROUGH THE FOUR 
OR FIVE YEARS OF COLLEGE. 

▲ THANKS FOR THE CORSAGE! THE WOMEN GRADUATES 
OFTEN RECEIVED FLOWERS FROM THEIR PARENTS, FAM- 
ILY AND FRIENDS AS OPEN DISPLAYS OF AFFECTION AND 
CONGRATULATIONS. 

► SENIOR RICH GATELY TAKES A MOMENT TO CALM HIS 
NERVES JUST MINUTES BEFORE THE BIG WALK ACROSS 
THE STAGE TO RECEIVE HIS DIPLOMA. HE RECEIVED A 
DEGREE IN MANAGEMENT SCIENCE. 

► ► AS ONE OF THE CLASS MARSHALS, ANDREA BICKUM 
HAS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF ENSURING THERE IS AN 
ORDERLY PROCESSION DURING THE COMMENCEMENT 
CEREMONY. ANDREA GRADUATED WITH A DEGREE IN 
ANTHROPOLOGY. 



ii 



N 



ot to be ministered unto, but to minister." The 
college motto was particularly appropriate as 
the Class of 1989 walked across the stage. 
The graduates completed the process of acquiring 
the education necessary to begin the next phase of 
their life in the "real world" where they would put 
into practice the knowledge that they had gained at 
Bridgewater. 

Their four years culminated in the event that took 
place on Saturday, May 27 — Bridgewater State Col- 
lege's 149th Commencement Ceremony. Parents, 
families, friends and the college community helped the 
approximately 1,200 students celebrate the joyous oc- 
casion. 

Commmencement speaker Lieutenant Governor Ev- 
elyn Murphy told the graduates about Horace Mann, 
the son of a Massachusetts farmer who decided to go 

Continued to Page 45 




42 



< "TASSELS MAY BE CHANGED. " GRADUATES WAITED 
EAGERLY FOR THIS MOMENT, AS IT SIGNIFIED THAT THEY 
WERE OFFICALLY GRADUATES OF BRIDGEWATER STATE 
COLLEGE. 





A ^ LT. GOVERNOR EVELYN MURPHY, THE FIRST 
WOMAN ELECTED TO THE CONSTITUTIONAL OF- 
FICE IN MASSACHUSEnS, WAS THE COMMENCE- 
MENT SPEAKER. SHE RECEIVED AN HONORARY 
DOCTORATE IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. 

A THE PROGESSIONAL MARKED THE BEGINNING 
OF THE COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY AS GRAD- 
UATES ENTERED THE CAVERNOUS TENT TO "POMP 
AND CIRCUMSTANCE." 

< < CAMERA. LIGHTS. ACTION. FLASHBULBS 
WENT OFF OFTEN BEFORE AND DURING THE COM- 
MENCEMENT CEREMONY AS PARENTS, FAMILIES, 
AND FRIENDS ALL SOUGHT TO GAIN SNAPSHOTS 
OF ONE OF THE MOST SPECIAL DAYS OF THE 
THEIR LIVES. 

M LOOKING ANXIOUSLY FOR HER PARENTS, JU- 
LIANNE ANDRADE WAITS FOR THE PROCESSIONAL 
TO BEGIN. JULIANNE GRADUATED SUMMA CUM 
UUDE WITH A DEGREE IN ELEMENTARY EDU- 
CATION. 



43 



► PHYSICAL EDUCATION MAJORS JEFF SEELEY, C.J. 
PATOTA, CARLOS OLIVEIRA, AND JIM THOMPSON GET 
TOGETHER OF ONE FINAL SHOT AS UNDERCLASSMEN 
BEFORE THEY RECEIVE THEIR DIPLOMA AND BECOME 
"ALUMNI". 




A THE GRADUATES RISE AS THE VICE PRESIDENT 
OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS, DR. MAORY-TAYLOR, 
PRESENTS THE CANDIDATES FOR BACHELOR'S DE- 
GREES. JUST MOMENTS EARLIER, THE MASTER'S 
CANDIDATES HAD RECEIVED THEIR DEGREES. 

A ► PRESIDENT RONDILEAU STANDS ASIDE CAR- 
OL FURR, CHAIRPERSON OF THE BOARD OF 
TRUSTEES, AS SHE READS THE CITATIONS OF THE 
HONORARY DOCTORATE OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND 
COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD, THE FIRST TIME IN 
BSC HISTORY ONE INDIVIDUAL HAS RECEIVED 
BOTH HONORS. 

► LT. GOVERNOR EVELYN MURPHY RECEIVES HER 
HONORARY DOCTORATE OF PUBLIC ADMINSTRA- 
TION. SHE TOLD THE GRADUATES "HARD WORK 
AND DISCIPLINE WILL SERVE YOU WELL" 

► ► GRADUATE LYNNE ZAKUR PAUSES TO RE- 
CEIVE CONGRATULATIONS FROM A FELLOW GRAD- 
UATE. LYNNE RECEIVED HER BACHELOR'S DEGREE 
IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. 



44 





elehrate Commencement 1919 
with Pomp and Circumstance! 

STUDENTLIF 



iK&. 



K-mmi exu Kjmmf- 



Continued from Page 42 

to college. The first building of the Bridgewater Nor- 
mal School was dedicated by Horace Mann. 

"His roots were in hard work and practicality/' said 
Murphy, adding that she also based her ethics on 
those qualities. She told the Class of 1989 "hard work 
and discipline will serve you well." 

Her advice to the graduating seniors was "Dare to 
dream about the finest, grandest work. Smell the roses. 
Take time to enjoy life." 

Murphy received an honorary doctorate of public 
administration. Other honorary doctorates went to Mr. 
John Healey and Mr. Henry Hampton. 

Mr. Healey, executive director of Amnesty Inter- 
national, received an honorary doctorate of public 
service and Mr. Hampton, executive producer of the 
acclaimed PBS television series "Eyes on the Prize: 
America's Civil Rights Years", received an honorary 

Continued to Page 46 





A ▲ PRIOR TO LINING UP FOR THE PROCESSIONAL, BETH 
RUPPENTHAL AND MARK MORIN TAKE A MOMENT TO 
WISH EACH OTHER GOOD LUCK. BETH GRADUATED WITH 
A DEGREE IN MATHEMATICS AND MARK WITH A COM- 
MUNICATIONS DEGREE. 

▲ CAROL FURR, CHAIRPERSON OF THE BOARD OF TRUST- 
EES, TAKES THE TIME THE PERSONALLY CONGRATULATE 
THE GRADUATING MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1989. 

< M VNO GRADUATES HUG EACH OTHER MOMENTS 
BEFORE THE PROCESSIONAL BEGINS AND ALSO EX- 
CHANGE ADDRESSES. GRADUATION INCLUDED FRANTIC 
MOMENTS OF GEHING THOSE ADDRESSES SO THAT THE 
FRIENDS COULD KEEP IN TOUCH IN THE FOLLOWING 
YEARS. 

< OUTSIDE THE AUDITORIUM AND UNDER THE SUN- 
SHINE, TWO GRADUATES WAIT FOR THEIR FRIENDS TO 
SHOW UP SO THEY CAN TAKE THEIR PLACE IN LINE. 



45 





elekrate Coirnnencement 1989 
witk Pomp and CirGumstance! 

TUDENTLIFE 



Continued from Page 45 

doctorate of fine arts. 

Acting President Adrian Rondileau received an hon- 
orary doctorate of public service and a community 
service aw^ard, the first time in BSC history one in- 
dividual has received both honors. 

'This may be the last time I have the opportunity to 
show^ my deepest appreciation to the college com- 
munity," Rondileau said, moved by the honors and by 
the remarks made by his colleques. 

Present at the ceremonies w^ere former acting pres- 
ident, Dr. Robert Dillman, who w^as in the audience to 
watch his son, John, receive a bachelor's degree in 
management science, and the president-elect. Dr. 
Adrian Tinsley. As Bridgewater's tenth and first wom- 
en president. Dr. Tinsley will assume the presidency 
on July 1, 1989. 

Ron Pettit 



▲ A THUMBS UPI SENIOR ROB GIMLER TAKES HIS WALK 
ACROSS THE STAGE TO RECEIVE HIS DIPLOMA. ROB 
RECEIVED HIS DEGREE IN COMMUNICATION. 

▲ ANOTHER GRADUATE IS CONGRATULATED BY CAROL 
FURR, CHAIRPERSON OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. OVER 
1,200 MEMBERS OF GRADUATING CLASS OF 1989 WERE 
GIVEN DEGREES THAT DAY. 

► AT THE END OF THE CEREMONY, GRADUATES ANX- 
IOUSLY SEARCHED UNDERNEATH THE TENT FOR THEIR 
PARENTS, FAMILIES, AND FRIENDS. OVER 3,500 PEOPLE 
FILLED THE HUGE TENT THAT MORNING TO WATCH THE 
CEREMONY. 

► ► PAUSING FOR THE APPLAUSE, CUSS PRESIDENT 
EDWARD NICOLEni WAITS A MOMENT BEFORE CON- 
TINUING WITH HIS INSPIRATIONAL ADDRESS TO HIS FEL- 
LOW CLASSMATES. 




46 



^ "CONGRATULATIONS. " PRESIDENT RONDILEAU 
SHAKES HANDS WITH SUE HUMPHREYS AS SHE WALKS 
ACROSS THE STAGE TO RECIEVE HER DEGREE IN EL- 
EMENTARY EDUCATION. 





▲ M "HELP! HELP!" TRAGI MASSARO, A COM- 
MUNICATIONS MAJOR, HELPS A FELLOW CUSS- 
MATE WITH HIS CAP. DAN O'BRIEN IS IN CENTER, 
AND RECEIVED A DEGREE IN MANAGEMENT SCI- 
ENCE. 

A "BEST WISHES!" PYSCHOLOGY MAJOR RACHEL 
DISANTO IS CONGRATULATED BY THE CHAIRPER- 
SON OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES CAROL FURR. 

<<k PROUD GRADUATE SHOWS OFF HER HARD 
EARNED DIPLOMA TO HER MOTHER. MANY GRAD- 
UATES COULD NOT HAVE MADE IT WITH THE SUP- 
PORT OF THEIR PARENTS AND FAMILIES. 

< PERCHED HIGH ON A CHAIR, A GRADUATE 
LOOKS FOR HER FAMILY AND A WAY OUT OF THE 
TENT. AS THE RAIN POURED DOWN AT THE END OF 
THE CEREMONY, THE GRADUATES AND THEIR 
FAMILIES RUSHED OUT OF THE TENT TO THE RE- 
CEPTION IN THE CAFETERIA OR TO THEIR CARS. 



47 






^x 



T 




here have been many studies done that show that students who live in the 
residences contribute more to the college," says Mela Dutka, director of 
housing. "Just take a look at the various student leaders on campus and see how 
many of them live on campus." Bridgewater State College, and the students 
themselves, certainly recognize the value of the residential experience and they 
are constantly working to enhance that experience. New and different programs 
and policies have been implemented this year — most notably the increased 
programming for the various residences. Project S.P.I.R.I.T and Hill Week were 
among the activities that made an impression on the residents. 





RESIDENCES 




NEW 

and 

DIFFERENT 



Josset J. Jones 

Residences Editor 









49 




50 



The Independent Dwdiers 



Apartment living is considered a test of 
adulthood. The students feel more in- 
dependent and are able to do whatever 
they v^ant to do and whenever they 
wish. Students in the apartments love it 
because of its privacy, unforgetable par- 
ties, and the social opportunities to meet 
other people. There are eleven entry 



ways leading to Apartments, which 
house approximately 250 students. In 
past years, the lottery for the apartments 
was extremely difficult and selective for 
upperclassmen. However, new changes 
have been implemented to give all stu- 
dents an opportunity at living at the 
Apartments. 





"^mm 



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51 



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54 





"It's the Fofc Patrot" 



Pope Hall, named after Sarah Elizabeth 
Pope, houses over 160 upperclass- 
women. "Pope Hall is fun to live in," 
said a few of the women as they de- 
scribed their dorm as "awesome" be- 
cause everyone respects each other's pri- 
vacy and study habits when studying for 
exams. The dorm is quiet when you need 
it, but can be a barrel of fun when the 
residents get rolling. In short, the women 
of Pope feel and act as one large family 



watching out and caring for one another. 
Besides the warm atmosphere at Pope 
there are several activities that are con- 
stantly working to bring all the girls 
closer as a unit. The Pope Executive 
Board is the organization which plans 
out year-round events as Family Feud, 
cook-outs with other dorms, movies, and 
much more. Pope Hall residents had a 
great year in 1989. 





55 










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Wftere tfte Boys ore!/ 



Scott Hall is named after former Pres- 
ident Zenos Scott. Located on lower 
campus by the tennis courts, Scott Hall 
has been known as "The Place To Be" 
when it comes to having a good time. 
Besides being a "Rockin"' dorm as some 
have said, Scott is a pleasure to live in 
because of the convenience of being on 
lower campus, and its closeness to just 
about everything. The Executive Board 
at Scott have done an outstanding job 



this past year in their planning of fun 
filled events which have brought every- 
one together. Events like pizza parties, 
whiffle ball tournaments, cookouts, and 
a whole lot more. Scott is a total im- 
provement from the infamous life as a 
freshman living at the Hill. Scott is quiet 
and peaceful thruoghout the school 
week until they gear up for the weekend 
on Thursdays. 





59 




60 






61 




62 



(< 



Tfmt's Li/e at Tfie Hiff" 



Shea-Durgin is one of the best dorms to 
live in as a Freshman. It is great because 
most freshman are housed here and that 
makes socializing and making friends a 
little bit easier. Shea-Durgin "The Hill" 
has been known for its friendliness, its 
size — which houses about 600 students 
— and especially for it's FIRE ALARMS. 
Waking up at 1:00 o'clock, 2:00 o'clock, 
or even 4:00 o'clock to trudge outside in 
the cold. The Hill, though, has been 
known for much more than its countless 



fire alarms. It is known mostly for the 
numerous parties that keep the dorm at a 
constant "alive" status. Parties begin 
early in the day around 4:00 o'clock after 
classes end and continue to roll on to 
sometimes the early hours of the next 
morning. Besides the students blowing 
of steam in thier parties, the Hill does 
have academic and athletic scenes too. 
The Hill can not fully be described but 
can only be experienced. 





63 




JUST 



64 




65 

















66 




Home of the. Mighty "Ihish" 







Woodward Hall, the oldest dorm on 
campus, received its name from former 
professor Sara Woodward. Woodward 
Hall known as simply "Wood", houses 
over 300 women on three floors with an 
infamous basement called the PIT. How- 
ever, more famous than the Pit is the 
water problem at Wood, where you can 
be burned by the shower when someone 
else flushes the toilet. Besides this little 



inconvenience the dorm has been known 
for its pulling together as a team. Most of 
the rooms are triples and quads, bringing 
more girls together as friends. Wood, like 
both Pope and Scott, has the similiar 
advantages where it is in the center of 
things. The dorm is on lower campus 
and is literally seconds from almost any 
desired location on campus, preferably 
the parties. 





67 




68 




h- 







69 





elping to make an impression on the students' education at Bridgewater are the 
members of the faculty, administration and staff. Truly dedicated to their 
profession, every professor, department head, and staff member is committed to 
the overall success of the College. Turn the pages and see the dedicated and 
caring members of the college community. . . 



70 



ACADEMICS 




Ron Pettit 

Academics Editor 



# 




« 
» 



NEW 

and 

DIFFERENT 





71 



Candids 



72 





73 



Acting President 




Dr. Adrian Rondileau 

Honorary L.H.D., Yankton College 
MA., Ph.D., Columbia University 
A.B., The City University of New York 



74 



EXECUTIVE Vice President 




Mr. Edward Meaney 

M.Ed., Northeastern University 
B.S., Bridgewater State College 



Acting Vice President, 
Academic Affairs 




Dr. Jacquelyn Madry-Taylor 



Vice President, 
Administration & 
Finance 




Professor Joseph B. Chicarelli 
B.S., MA., Boston College 



ACTING Vice President, 
Student Services 




Dean Martha Jones 

M.Ed., Tufts University 

B.S., Bridgewater State College 



75 



Office of 
ACADEMIC Affairs 



Marian Marra, Joyce Cook, Joan Luiz, and Dr. Jac- 
quelyn Y. Madry-Taylor, Acting Vice President, Ac- 
ademic Affairs. 



Office of 

Administration and Finance 

Liz Sironen, Lucy Cummings, and Linda Wright. 



Administrative Services 



Nancy Wallenmaier, David Morwick, Director, Ger- 
aldine Bunavicz, Associate Director, and Gina Guas- 
coni. 



Admissions 



Front Row: Nanette Balnes, Marian Spencer, Pegge 
Powers, Rosalie DeTerra. Back Row: Dwight Cook, 
Assistant Director, Janet Taylor, Paul Bonitto, James 
Plotner, Jr., Associate Dean, Ann Ferris. 




76 




Affirmative action 

AND minority AFFAIRS 



Joanne McKee, and Paul L. Gaines, Assistant to the 
President, Affirmative Action and Minority Affairs. 



office of 
Alqmni Relations 



Anne Marie Fraser, Shirley Hogan, Philip A. Conroy, 
Jr., Director, Mary Freeman, Susan Kirker. 



FOCUS: Campos Ministries 




Sister Jo-ann Veillette. 



^^ Campus Ministries are an in- 
tegral part of student life. Their aim is to 
provide opportunities for personal growth 
through prayer, study, fellowship, and 
counseling. 

Adjacent to the college campus is the St. 
Basil Catholic Center. The Catholic Center 
welcomes all students, regardless of re- 
ligious affiliation, to enjoy its chapel, li- 
brary, quiet study area, typewriters, kitch- 
en, bible study, moments of prayer, 
counseling, and hospitality. 




Father Robert Connors. 



77 



ART Department 



Front Row: Stephen Smalley, Dorothy Pulslfer. Back 
Row: Joan Hausrath, William Kendall, Roger Dunn, 
John Heller, John Proege, Mercedes Nunez. 



ATHLETICS DEPARMTENT 



Front Row: Bo Ruggiero, Associate Director, Cecelia 
DeMarco, Director. Back Row: Mike O'Neill, Matthew 
Gerken, Sue Crosby. 



BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT 



Front Row: Diane Peabody, Sandra Whelan. Back 
Row: Doralswami Shanmugasundaran, J.C. Jahoda, 
Florian Muckenthaler, Walter Morin, Walter Hewitson, 
F. Hardy Moore. 



BURNELL SCHOOL 



Front Row: Chris Leland, Sally Pheeney, Jaine Reid, 
Ruth Fitzpatrick, Carol Nicholeris, Louis Taris, Marian 
Nelson, Betty Noyes. Back Row: Steve Traw, As- 
sociate Dean and Principal, Richard Gopen, Marjorie 
Teitelbaum, Debbie Waterman, Shirley Wood, Lydia 
A. Gerhardt, Dick Deschenes, Carlo Freitas, Jeane 
Lincoln, Noreen Asci, Stacia Young, Lynda Jayne, 
Judith Bernard, Louise Chiappina, Marian Doyle. 




78 




Campos Center 
DIRECTOR'S Office 



Front Row: Donna Nickerson, Carolynn Carey, Mark 
Johnson, Elaine Wambolt. Back Row: Pamela Arrighi, 
Jane Donovan, Kathy Ryan, Rick Veno, Director, 
Mary Edgington, Betty Ann Wray. 



Office of Career 
Planning and Placement 



J, Denny Ciganovic, Director, Jean Lyons, Sheila Davis, 
and Donna Esposito. 



Chemistry 
Department 



.. A Anne Wheller, Linda Stafford, Vahe Marganian, 
>- ..if Wilnom Chlpman, Henry Daley, James Conley, Mar- 

garet Souza, and Joseph Pagano. 



COPY Center 



Gerry Perron and Gerry Krappe. 



79 



Counseling Center 



Lila Annaloro, Daniel R. Diethelm, Director, and Susan 
Zeichner. 



earth science and 
Geography Department 



Front Row: Vernon Domingo, Robert E. Boutilier, 
Marilyn Furlong. Back Row: Aggrapina Macewicz, 
Reed F. Stewart, Ira Furlong, Glenn Miller, Richard 
Enright. ' 



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Elementary & Early 
Childhood education 



Front Row: Jerry Thornell, Judith Deckers, Diane 
Draheim, Wayne Philips. Back Row: John Deasy, 
Tom Wolpert, Wayne Dickenson, Burt Goldman, Ray 
Harper, Peter A. Bizinkaukas. 



Office of executive 
Vice President 

Lucille Albert, Jean Zona, and Janet Producz. 




80 




Facilities 



Jim Cummings Director, 




Office of 
Financial Aid 



Gerard V. Stenerson, Maureen Bicknell, and David W. 
Janey, Director. 



Graduate School 



Ronald Pariseau, Mary MacPherson, Marilyn Barry 
Dean, and Paul Wright. 



Grants Office 

Terry Anne Vigil, Director, and Jacqueline Neely. 



81 



HEALTH Services 



Front Row: Val Thorns, Catherine Williams, Carol 
Pickering. Back Row: Janice Murphy, Acting Direc- 
tor, Matthew Gerken, Margaret Flaherty. 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION AND 
RECREATION 



Front Row: Al Williams, Paul Dubois, Bob Frederick, 
Robert Haslam, Peter Mazzaferro, Carolyn Cramer. 
Back Row: Cheryl Hitdhings, Amos Nwosu, Shirley 
Krasinski, Marcia Anderson, Joe Huber, Edward J. 
Hart, Mary Lou Thornburg, Pat Phillips, Regina Gross, 
Janice Harris, Johan Smith. 



HISTORY DEPARTMENT 



Front Row: Donald Keay, Dennis Lythgoe, Benjamin 
Spence, David M. Culver, Thomas Turner. Back Row: 
Jean Stomehouse, Philip Silvia, John Myers, Alfred 
Wolff, W.C. Oien, P. Karavites, William Cole, Gerald J. 
Doiron, Lucille O'Connell. 



HOUSING 



Front Row: Ellen Cuttle, Tim Millerick, Mela Dutka, 
Director, Grace Jackson, Sue Sullivan. Back Row: 
Kathryn Tracey, Amy Beckerman, Bryan King, Mi- 
chael Volpone, Bryan Alford, Kevin Kindregan, Dan 
Darcy, Maureen Healy. 



82 





INFORMATION SERVICES 



Front Row: Lady Kimberly, Lady Kerri, Lady Vi, Lady 
Tammy. Back Row: Sir James, Sir Thomas, Sir Wil- 
liam, Sir Barry. 



MAILROOM 



Viswanath Subramaniam, Maureen Regan, Shirley 
Wilbur, and Bakar Sheriff. 



FOCUS: Office of the President 




The President's Office is the hub of things at Bridgewater State 
College. Serving the top administrator on campus, the Pres- 
ident, the staff members coordinate schedules and appoint- 
ments, arrange and plan meetings among many other things. 

Office of the President. Front Row: Tracey Perry and Eliz- 
abeth Anneseley. Back Row: Evelyn Archibald and Patricia 
Amaral, Assistant to the President. 



83 



MATHEMATICS 
& COMPUTER SCIENCE 



Front Row: A. Sattar, Gail Price, Philip Scalisi, Shama 
Y. Gma, Jean M. Prendergast. Back Row: R.J. Bent, 
G.C. Sethares, John Nee, Richard Quindley, Robert F. 
Sutherland, Glenn Pavlicek, Tobi Lorenzen, Paul Fair- 
banks, Robert Lemos, Jeffrey Butz, E.J. Lambiase. 



MAXWELL LIBRARY 



Mabell Bates, Shu-Chen Tu, Carol Neubauer, Cynthia 
Webber, Robert Simmons, Owen T.P. McGowan, Di- 
rector, Mary Myers, Alan G. Howell, Adeline Ziino, 
Shirley Libby, Susan Phister, and Sheau-Hwang 
Chang. 



MEDIA SERVICES 



Front Row: Glenn Cook, Director, Ruth Wagner, Wal- 
ter Deady. Back Row: Richard Gopen, Arthur 
Slotnick, Mike Hausmann, Arthur Wood. 



MEDIA AND 
LIBRARIANSHIP 



Thomas Lee, Robert Ward, Alan Lander, and Richard 
Neubauer. 




84 




MUSIC DEPARTMENT 



Front Row: Dorothy Ferry, Ian Johnstone. Back Row: 
Jacob Liberies, Henry Santos, Maxine Asselin. 



Office of 
Personnel and Payroll 



Margarida Vieira, Mellnda McCrae, Sally Stewart, Pe- 
ter Tsaffaras, Director, and Mary Hogan. 



PHYSICS DEPARTMENT 



George Weygand, Richard Calusdian, Felix S. Palubin- 
skas, and Grace M. Healy. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 



Front Row: David Sudhalter. Back Row: Kema 
Irogbe, Michael Kryzanek, Paul F. Jena, Guy Clifford. 



85 



Office of 
Public Affairs 



Front Row: Karen Callan, Marie Murphy Director. 
Back Row: David Wilson, Director, Sally Costello, 
Mike Storey, Roberta Harris, Nancy Santos. 



REGISTRAR'S OFFICE 



Front Row: Nancy Clay, Dennis Bicknell, Director, 
Thomas Chaffee. Back Row: Joan Schlatz, Leona 
Mazzoleni, Ronald Perry, Dawn Wentworth, Peg Mer- 
cier. 



SOCIOLOGY AND 
ANTHROPOLOGY 



Front Row: Don Armfield, Sandra Faiman-Silva. Back 
Row: Abraham Thomas, Curtiss Hoffman, Walter F. 
Carroll, Howard B. London. 



Speech Communication 



Front Row: Sylvia White, Dr. Joel Litvin. Back Row: 
Joanne Wuschke, Suzanne Ramczyk, Susan J. Mis- 
kelly, Nancy Street, Steven Levine, Susan Holton, 
Chairperson, Lee Dunne, Richard Warye, Sandra 
Briggs, Arthur Dirks. 




86 




Office of 
Student Payment 



Front Row: Jeanne Driscoll, Sue Hickey, Clare Wer- 
ner. Back Row: Valerie Cabral, Elaine Spacco, Bar- 
bara Russek, Janet Prodouz. 



Office of 
Student Services 



Front Row: Rita Ouellette, Margaret Sheibley. Back 
Row: Mary MacPherson, Bill Drapau Jr., Hannah 
Cracower, Martha Jones, Acting Vice President, Stu- 
dent Services. 



FOCUS: Office of Public Affairs 




Marie Morphy "86 and David Wilson 72. 



T 

■ he Office of Public Affairs is one 

^" of the busiest offices on campus, 

overseeing all the publications and public 

relations functions of Bridgewater State 

College. 

Public Affairs is responsible for the pro- 
duction of the following publications: 
Bridgewater TODAY, Bridgewater Re- 
view, Commonwealth Review , the Col- 
lege Catalog, Admissions Viewbook, and 
countless other publications. 

Public Affairs also handles many of the 
public relations functions of the coflege 
such as press releases to area newspapers 
about the positive achievements of the 
BSC students and faculty. 



87 








I 



nvolvement was the trend this year as more and more students were getting involved 
in campus organizations this year. Student activism increased as students became 
active and expressed their opinions. Many new clubs and organizations were created 
this year in response to students' interest in social issues such as Amnesty 
International and Students for Life. Many of the long-standing clubs and 
organizations such as Afro-American Society and Student Alumni Relations 
Committee gained many new members as students became more interested in being 
involved. Students certainly made their mark on Bridgewater State College in 1989. 



88 



ORGANZATIONS 




Leighann McGovern 

Organizations Editor 



NEW 

and 

DIFFERENT 









89 





J nvolvement was the trend this year as 
more and more students were getting 
involved in campus organizations this 
year. Student activism increased as stu- 
dents became active and expressed their 
opinions. Many new clubs and organ- 
izations were created this year in re- 
sponse to students' interest in social is- 
sues such as Amnesty International and 
Students for Life. Many of the long- 
standing clubs such as the Afro- 
American Society and Student Alumni 
Relations Committee gained many new 
members as student became more in- 
terested in being involved. Students cer- 
tainly made their mark on Bridgewater 
State College in 1989 through their in- 
volvement. 



90 





INDEX 



Accounting and Finance Club 92 

Adult Special Education 93 

Afro-American Society 94 

American Marketing Association (AMA) 95 

Amnesty International 96 

Black Students 94 

under Afro-American Society 
Board of Governors 98 

under Campus Center Board of Governors 
Bus Drivers .^ 128 

under Transit Service 
Business Clubs 92,95,122 

see Accouting and Finance Club 

American Marketing Association 

Society for the Advancement of Management Science 

Chemistry Club 97 

Campus Center Board of Governors 98 

Campus Center Program Committee 99 

Class of 1989 Officers 100 

Class of 1990:Officers 101 

Class of 1991 Officers 102 

Class of 1992 Officers 103 

The Comment 104 

Communications Club 106 

Dance Company 114 

Early Childhood Education Association (ECEA) .... 107 

Earth Science and Geography Club 112 

English Club 113 

Ensemble Theatre 115 

Forensics 116 

Freshman Class Officers 103 

under Class of 1992 Officers 

Game Club 117 

Government Related Organizations ... 121, 124, 126 

see Political Science Club 

Student Court 

Student Government Association 

International Club 118 

Junior Class Officers 101 

under Class of 1990 Officers 

Lower Campus Judicial Board 108 

Karate Club 119 

Media Clubs 104, 106, 130 

see The Comment 

Communications Club 

WBIM Radio Station 
Minority Interest Groups 94, 129 



see Afro- American Society 

Women's Center 
National Student Speech, Learning, and Hearing Associ- 
ation (NSSLHA) . 120 

Performing Arts Clubs 114, 115 

see Dance Company 

Ensemble Theatre 

Political Science Club 121 

Pope Hall Executive Board 109 

Program Committee 99 

under Campus Center Program Committee 
Radio Station 130 

under WBIM 

Residence Hall Council 110 

Residence Hall Organizations 108-109 

see Lower Campus Judicial Board 

Pope Hall Executive Board 

Residence Hall Council 

Shea/Durgin Executive Board 
SAMS 122 

under Society for the Advancement of Management Science 
SARC 123 

under Student Alumni Relations Committee 
Science Clubs 97, 112 

see Chemistry Club 

Earth Science and Geography 
Senior Class Officers 100 

under Class of 1989 Officers 

Shea/Durgin Executive Board Ill 

Society for the Advancement of Management Science 

(SAMS) 122 

Sophmore Class Officers 102 

under Class of 1991 Officers 
Speech Communication Clubs 106, 116, 120 

see Communications Club 

Forensics 

National Student Speech Learning and Hearing Association 

Student Alumni Relations Committee (SARC) 123 

Student Court 126 

Student Government Association (SGA) 124 

Student New^spaper 104 

under The Comment 

Students for Life 127 

Transit Service 128 

WBIM 130 

Womens Center 129 



91 



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The Accounting and Finance Club def- 
initely "worked hard for their money" 
this year. Club members had their eyes 
set on London, England for their first 
international educational field trip this 
year. They had gotten some SGA fund- 
ing, but in order to raise additional funds 
for the trip they held many fundraisers 



such as a candy bar sale, a Celtics raffle. 
Other events that the club sponsored this 
year were career night, and two work- 
shops on interviews and resume writing. 
It was certainly a year that was all 
"green" for the Accounting and Finance 
Club. 




ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE. Front Row: Darlene Costa, James M. Dunphy, John Stachowiak, Jim Cadorette, Vardis Kiel, Robyn M. 
Humphrey, Nancy L. Carson. Second Row: Louis Pereira, Wendy Pratt, Maureen NcLallen, Sharon Kee, Carrie Jokinen, Sandra Williams, 
Kathleen Moore, Professor Sevigny. Back Row: Patti Page, Kelley Taylor, John W. Disher, Gregory J. Mullen, Marc Lane, Eric Desjourdy. 



92 




CLUBS1989 




Lending A Helping 



The Adult Special Education Program 
functions as a community service course 
at BSC. It involves a totally voluntary 
student effort, using college and com- 
munity persons and various campus re- 
sources to help mentally retarded adults 
in the surrounding communities. The 
program, which started out informally 



and small, has grown into a large two- 
semester effort to help the special stu- 
dents learn basic/life skills development 
in math, reading, spelling, and writing. 
The program is open to all students who 
are interested in special education and 
the handicapped. 




Adult Special Education 





ADULT SPECIAL EDUCATION. First Row: Joan M. Komola, Tracy A. Tortorella, John French, Diane McDonough, Paula Anderson, 
Marjorie Richards, Pam Patenaude. Second Row: Kathy O'Connor, Mary Achtelik, Christine Crowley, Margaret Wilds, Gina Miniacci, 
Christine Aulenback, Kevin Richards, Sheryl Bartley. Back Row: Sandra Marinelli, Tim Hatfield, Lennon Lansdown, Chris Manley, Anne 
Roy, Lisa Delande, Debbie Dennison, Norma Melchionno, Judi Foley. 



93 




0^ (.O) (Q) r^ 



0] Co^ ( 

o 



Black By Popular 
Demand! 



"Black by Popular Demand", 
a member's t-shirt, shows the strength of 
the Afro-Amercian Society. The organ- 
ization, which was formed in the 70's, 
tries to serve as a force by which the 
minorities can come together to learn 
about their heritage and promote har- 



s relationships on campus. This 
year the Afro-Am held many activities 
and particpated in the Homecoming Pa- 
rade. They also help to sponsor a lecture 
series which featured Dr. Loretta Long 
who plays "Susan" of "Sesame Street". 




FR^ American Society M 




AFRO-AMERICAN SOCIETY. Front Row: Jacqueline Rosa, Maria Lovo, Brenda D. Lawton, Jacqueline Holmes, Sheila M. Colon, Eric A. 
Jaundoo, Lionel M. Yearwood. Back Row: Maria E. Pina, Tracey Hector, Doreatha Rogers, Shalaan Cowart, Helena Rodrigues, Linda Goss. 



94 




CLUBS1989 




The American Marketing Association is 
one of the many business clubs that are 
offered to management majors. Provided 
for those management majors who have 
a concentration in marketing, AMA 
presents a special opportunity for its 
members. As a part of a national or- 
ganization, Bridgewater State College's 
chapter of AMA was founded in Fall 



1987 by Professor Keyes, a marketing 
professor. Set up similiar to many real 
business organizations, AMA expects a 
certain level of professionalism from its 
members in conducting many of its pro- 
grams. AMA helps its members to gain 
that extra edge, and this is proven once 
they graduate and obtain their first job. 



■■■■■■■■■*■ ' jjiim 

TSmerican Marketing Association^ 




AMERICAN MARKETING ASSOCIATION. Front Row: Donna M. Venancio, George F. Baldino, Kellie Lantz, Daniel J. O'Brien, Dianne P. 
McNeil. Back Row: Kevin Alcaro, Prof. Sylvia Keyes, Donna Conley. 



95 



cfl 




•133 




3 TTH 



Amnesty International is a world wide organization of Amnesty International 

human rights organization. The dubs' has participated in are guest lecturers 

purpose is to help free political prisoners, and letter writing campaigns. The club 

give fair treatment to prisoners, and put members have also taken part in the 

an end to torture and the death penalty. International Club Model U.N. as well. 
Some of the activities that our campus 




AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL. First Row: Sal Zerilli, Tammi Hough, Shannon Kenny, Sean Ward, Dianna Fiske, Anna Langenfeld. Back 
Row: Christine Cleary, Prof. Vernon Domingo, Frank Faheit, Bruce Connolly, Daubi Trenholm, Donna Pavia. 



96 



^ 








U 



OHO. 





CLUBS1989 








They do not all just blow up laboratories. 
The chemistry students also get involved 
w^ith their major through involvement 
with the Chemistry Club, but a student 
need not be a chemistry major to be 
involved. Arranged through the depart- 
ment, the members can tour of the chem- 
istry department at MIT and can attend 



several lectures given by guest speakers. 
Juniors and Seniors have the chance to 
intern at different chemical companies. 
The Chemistry Club this year held the 
Boston Bruins Raffle and went on trips to 
the Polaroid Company and Corning 
Glass Works. 





CHEMISTRY CLUB. Front Row: Wassim Khoury, Andrea Neal, Sherri Noyes, Rosann Kozlowski, Bridget Chin. Back Row: Dr. Vahe 
Marganian, Matthew C. Clark, Ann Morrill, Jonathan Morse. 



97 



Welcome Aboard the 



The Campus Center Board of Governors Governors have been looking into is new 
serves to advise and make recomrhen- furniture and a paint job overhaul for the 
dations concerning policies and proce- Center. The Board of Governors also as- 
dures to the Director of the Campus sesses the services provided by the Cam- 
Center. Some projects that the Board of pus Center. 




BOARD OF GOVERNORS. Front Row: Stephen Abreu, Lee Stanford, Pam Sweeney, Cara Petrie, Ted Pettine. Back Row: Gracieta S. De 
Abreu, Barbara Daniels, William Pimentel, Richard Veno, Denny Ciganovic, Peter Hart, Amy Beckerman, Diane M. Accomando. 



98 




CLUBS1989 




As a sub-committee of the Board of Gov- 
ernors, the Campus Center Program 
Committee's main purpose is to provide 
quality activities and events for the 
Bridgewater State College community. 
Providing nearly 90% of the on-campus 
activities, the Program Committee's 



main goal for this year was to have the 
best programs ever. Some of the events 
the Program Committee sponsored were 
the Fall Outdoor Concert, DJs in the Rat, 
numerous Club Soda shows and the 'Til 
Tuesday Outdoor Concert in the spring. 




CAMPUS CENTER PROGRAM COMMITTEE. Front Row: Marie Travers, Caitlin Andrews, Jennifer Coates, Curtis Howard, Jacqueline 
Lobos, Pamela Sweeney, Marie Canavan. Second Row: Susan Hurwitz, Tobi Krasnow, Stephen Abreu, Christina Aylward, Peter Hart, 
Barbara Daniels, Cathleen Warren, LuAnne Kent, Cathy Cloutier, Pam Arrighi. Back Row: Cara Petrie, Peter Boutin, David Smith, William 
Pimentel, Doug Eckelkamp III, Pamel Holm. 



99 



c^ 




OUoUOl'nl (OUono 




The Senior Class Officers are known to 
be one of the most active and enthu- 
siastic out of all the classes. They plan 
such events as Homecoming Queen and 
King elections, special events in the Rat, 
all the activities of traditional Senior 
Week. On the exciting agenda of Senior 



Week is the Outdoor Hawaiian Luau, 
Boston Harbor "Booze Cruise", Senior 
Night at the Rat, and the Senior Dinner 
Dance, held the night before Graduation. 
The class officers work hard to give the 
Senior Class the best time of their life at 
Bridgewater. 





SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS. Nikki Constantine, Nandine DeDoming, Ray Puglisi, Ed Nicoletti, and Susan E. Gentile. 



100 




CLUBS1989 




As tradition dictates, the Junior Class 
Office have the huge responsibility of 
planning the Spring Ball, one of the big- 
gest social events of the year. The 1990 
Class Officers worked hard to plan the 
appropriate setting and dining ac- 
comodations for a spectacular event. 
Everyone who attended this year's 



Spring Ball had a wonderful time and 
gained many precious memories in 
which they would remember for a life- 
time. The Class Officers learned that 
hard work and determination does pay 
off as they pulled off one of the biggest 
nights of the year. 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS. Front Row: Sharon Cignetti, Sheryl Bartley, Karen Weiner. Back Row: Kevin Kindregan, Jorge Neves. 



101 



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r Sophomores 



The Sophomore Class Officers conhriuea ine lyyl Llass Uihc^rs worked hard 

in Bridgewater State College tradition and diligently with each other to reach 

like other class officers in attempting to their goals for their class and each other, 
unify their classmates with each other. 






SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS. Pamela Grimes, Sean Gately, Robert Patriquin, and Dwight Groom. 



102 



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The Class of 1992 Officers, like other 
class officers, worked hard to plan and 
promote activities designed to bring their 
class together. Holding weekly meetings, 
the class officers developed their new 
ideas to create a successful freshman 



year with the help of their advisor, Susan 
Sullivan '88, a college intern, served as 
the officer's advisor. Their ultimate goal 
was to help their classmates feel wel- 
come and comfortable in their college 
community. 




1 ^ 

FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS. Susan Sullivan, Loma Holmes, James Hardiman, Joe Palumbo, John Gaivin, and Pamela Murphy. 



103 



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The Comment 

ife at the student newspaper is sixty years the Comment has been both 

never dull and thanks to the informing and entertaining students 

topsy turvy year 1989,that state- campus wide. Staff members learn and 

ment still holds true. For over sharpen new skills in writing, design. 




THE COMMENT. Front Row: Bryon Hayes, Angela Comacchioli, Ed Ward, Caitlin Andrews, John Bums. 
Second Row: Mary Beth MacNeil, Stephen J. McPhee, Charles P. Tsouprake, Paul C. Coumoyer, Debra S. 
Willis, Nicole T. Rozanski. Back Row: Martha Thompson, Patrick Hurley, David Flannery. 



business, advertising, photography, but 
most importantly communication. The 
Comment has traditionally offered stu- 
dents a rare opportunity to deal with and 
manage people in a pseudo-business set- 
ting amid the confines of the academia of 
Bridge water State College. 

The year began the resignation of Ed- 
itor Christine Howard who had been ac- 
cepted into an exchange program to Chi- 
na. Business Manager Edmund Ward 
was elected to the vacant position by a 
slim margin. Ward's support of manag- 
ing editor John Burns during preliminary 
nominations led to news editor Bryon 
Hayes strong showing against Ward. 

During the fall semester the Comment 
reported on, among others, the infamous 
Homecoming T-shirt scandal and the se- 
lection of Dr. Adrian Tinsley as president 
of the college — a job turned down by 
other presidental candidates Ekman and 
Warren. When the semester ended. 
Ward decided not to run for reelection 
and Bryon Hayes was elected almost un- 
animously as Editor. 

Hayes' term ushered in a new era for 

the Comment. It became bigger than 

ever before as average length grew by 

almost 75% and the staff numbered over 

twenty. 

Continued on Next Page 




Arts & Entertainment 
Editor 

Caitlin Andrews 



Photo Editor 

Debra Willis 



Ad Manager 

Stephen McPhee 



Junior Sports Editor 

Paul Coumoyer 



104 




CLUBS1989 



Continued from Previous Page 
News wasn't hard to find during the 
spring, the trustees and the Board of 
Regents of Higher Education made sure 
of that with their constant endorsement 
of new fees and tuition hikes. In early 
April, the Comment opposed the an- 
nouncement that Lieutenant Governor 
Evelyn Murphy would be the spring 
Commencement Speaker and Hayes 
drew media attention from the Boston 
Globe which featured him among others 
in the oppposition. 

In March, Joseph Mucci's American 
Opinion, a new student newspaper, ap- 
peared on the campus scene. Mucci and 
the Comment battled over the issue of 
the reestablishement of MassPIRG at 
BSC and after the MassPIRG victory 
Mucci's paper disappered for several 
weeks. 

As the semester drew to a close a band 
of former Comment staff members, led 
by former Editors of the Comment Brent 
Rossi and Ed Ward, started another new 
student newspaper, the Bridgewater 
Tribune and vowed to continue it next 
semester. 

The student newspaper business at 
Bridgewater State College is sometimes 
tedious and confusing, but it's always 
fun and it's never dull. 
Ed Ward 




Editor in Chief, Fall 
Business Manager, Spring 

Edmund F. Ward 




Managing Editor, Fall 
Editor in Chief, Spring 

Bryon Hayes 



Executive Editor 

John R. Burn III 



Senior Sports Editor 

Angela Cornacchioli 



105 



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It's Not All Talk 



Bridgewater State College's Communi- 
cations Club has just recently been re- 
vived on campus. Formed for the stu- 
dents in the one of college's largest 
majors, the Communications Club gives 



its members new perspectives on the 
world of radio, television, sales, and 
public relations within the communica- 
tions field. ij 




Communications Club 





COMMUNICATIONS CLUB. Front Row: Andrea Ayer, Pam Laubenstein, Annmarie Weir, Sheryl Barttey, Mark Miller. Back Row: Jackie 
Capavella, Laura Martan, Vinny Femald, Jeff Valin, Janet Lord, Melanie Maloney, Robyn Gaynor, Jon Kidder. 



106 




CLUBS1989 



Welcome To Sesame 
Street 



The Early Childhood Education Asso- 
ciation was recently revived on our cam- 
pus to meet the needs of Early Education 
majors. This year the club has had two 
successful fundraisers, a bake sale and an 
M & M candy sale and at Christmas time. 



they went caroling at the Brockton City 
Hospital's pediatrics ward. The Early 
Childhood Education Association plans 
and puts on various activities and pro- 
grams that help further the members' 
professional knowledge of the field. 




EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ASSOCIATION. Front Row: Denise Murphy, Michelle Greeley, Kristen Norman, Kristen Darling, 
Bethanne Welch, Angela Beninati. Back Row: Cheryle Perry, Kimberley Sweeney, Denise Lank, Jack Jones, Kerry Barnes, Susan Manning. 



107 




The Lower Campus Judical Board hears 
cases of alleged violations of College pol- 
icy in and/or around residence halls and 
recommends sanctions to the Housing 
Office. The Lower Campus residence 
halls — Pope, Scott, and Woodward 
Halls — have one common judical board 
comprised of three elected members and 



three appointed members. The candi- 
dates for the Lower Campus Judical 
Board have to be in good academic 
standing as well as be in good disci- 
plinary standing with the College in or- 
der to qualify to run for a position on the 
board. 




Lower Campus JudicalBoard^ 



I 






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LOWER CAMPUS JUDICIAL BOARD. Chuck Lindberg, Tim Donegan, Paula Gibbons, Seila Darling, and Brian Fariey. 



108 



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Are Thev Really Nuns? 



The Pope Hall Executive Board's main 
purpose is to provide resources, answer 
questions/ make Pope Hall a pleasant 
place to live, and to provide social 
events. The main goal of this year's Ex- 
ecutive Board was to provide unity 
among the Pope Hall residents. They 



accomplished this through the|r various 
activities. In holding weekly |neetings, 
the Executive Board provides its mem- 
bers with valuable experi^^ in gov- 
erning the dormitory and creativity in 
developing new and interesting pro- 
grams. 




Pope Hall ExEdBTWf BoarT 




POPE HALL EXECUTIVE BOARD. Diane DiMarco, Kimberly Trotter, Jacqueline Holmes, Anne Cloutier, and Lisa Orlandello. 



109 




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The Executive Boards of each of the res- 
idence halls elected a representative who 
was a member of the Residence Hall 
Council. As council member, this rep- 
resentative was responsible for helping 
the Residence Hall Council fulfill its 
main functions. These main functions in- 
cluded encouraging and improving inter- 
residental communication and activities; 



improving the rapport among the stu- 
dents, faculty, and administrators; and 
organizing, supervising, and executing 
the election processes of each of the Ex- 
ecutive Boafa^'^lctraS and Appellate 
Boards, and the Residence Hall Council. 
This year's Council was especially proud 
of their main program — Project 
S.P.I.R.I.T. 




Residence Hall Council 



i^-^i.-£2Jls£<h^k 





RESIDENCE HALL COUNCIL. Front Row: Deborah L'ltlaien, Elisa Simonian, Christine McDonald, James Shaffer, Annmarie Weir, Stacey 
Brandon, Jackie Holmes. Back Row: Maureen Healy, Ana Leandres, Kimberly Trotter, Stephen Richards, Michael Delia Penna, Maryann 
Kilroy, Lyn Maney, Ronli Berlinger. Missing: Doug Sutherland, Marlon Wilson, Shalaan Cowart. 



110 




CLUBS1989 




The Shea-Durgin Executive Board ini- 
tiates succesful programming for the en- 
tire dorm. This includes educational, so- 
cial, cultural, as well as physical/athletic 
programs. The main goal of this year's 
Executive Board was to plan successful 
programs in order to make the dormitory 
experience enjoyable and rewarding. 



The Executive Board funded all the Res- 
ident Assistant programs as well as their 
own functions. Their worked in close 
contact with the Residence Hall Council 
and the Food Service. This year's Ex- 
ecutive Board was proud to present the 
annually successful "Hill Week". 




HEA/DURGIN EXECUTIVE BOARDJ 




SHEA/DURGIN EXECUTIVE BOARD. Front Row: Nick Salvi, Michael Delia Penna, Michelle Greeley. Back Row: Glenn Gonsalves, Lauren 
Cunningham, Ana Leandres, Corinne Reming. 



Ill 















"lAmARock'^ 



The Earth Science and Geography Club sponsor a continuing lecture series. Over 

of Bridgewater State College has long Spring Break, they traveled to Mexico to 

been known to be one of the most active study and observe geological sites. The 

clubs on campus. Not only do they run club is also known to be one of the 

field trips, but they raise a lot of their largest clubs on campus to this day. 
own funds, offer tutoring sessions, and 




EARTH SCIENCES AND GEOGRAPHY. Front Row: Andrea Neal, Mary Ellen Lynch, Louise Brouillard, James F. Smith, Dorothy Girten, 
Paul E. Donnelly, Kathy Counter. Back Row: Derick Bodamer, Stephen Culp, Sherri Noyes, Joe Macanec, Charles J. McDonald, Diane 
Pankiewicz, Jonathan Morse, Tom Chamberlin. 



112 



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The English Club is back again! The the club has sponsored this year is a 

Bridgewater State College Community is spaghetti supper, a raffle and a trip to 

welcome to be a part of the newly tour the WCVB Channel 5 television stu- 

formed group. Some of the activities that dio. 




ENGLISH CLUB. Front Row: Jonathan Peters, Catherine Webber, Elizabeth A. Wale. Back Row: Deborah Charland, Dr. Clifford Wood, Bill 
Conard, Betsy Eaton. 



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May I Have This Dance? 



The main purpose of Dance Company is 
to bring dance and the arts to BSC and to 
give other students on-campus an ap- 
preciation for dance and to see the en- 
tertainment that the Company can pro- 
vide them through dance. This year saw 
the name of this dance group change 
from Dance Corps to Dance Company, 



reflecting a more professional feeling. 
They held a very succesful fall produc- 
tion, "Dance Kaledeiscope" and an 
equally succesful spring production. The 
group remained strong as ever, contin- 
uing to have large membership of stu- 
dent who worked hard to bring about 
great performances. 




Dance Company 





DANCE COMPANY. Front Row: Mike "Zeke" Zeoli and Craig Uni. Second Row: Heidi K. Eklund, Annette Belaneer, Michelle Tirado, Gene Reiber, 
Nancy Wade, Lisa Marcheterre, Jodi Scarborough, Lisa Bennett. Third Row: Stacey Heming, Jennifer Condon, Melissa Tarzopoulos, Doreen Duarte, 
Thuy Cook, Andrea Young, Naoe Suzuki, Cindi Obey, Mark Dennen. Third Row: Dr. Nancy Moses, Barbara DiMartino, Frances Clenioris, Juhe Lynch, 
Jane Ziemski, Joey Skelton, Kathleen Hughes, Nicole Rozanski, Melissa Barton, Rachel Boissonneau. Back Row: Tamara Perry, Laune Needs, Bethany 
Goulet, Kate Clancy, Christopher Mather, Robin Gallagher, Dawn Poole, and Jossett J. Jones. 



114 




CLUBS1989 



All BSfi's A Staae! 



Ensemble Theatre's main purpose is to 
support, contribute, and guide theatre at 
Bridgewater State College by funding 
educational field trips and putting on 
several productions during the year. The 
main goal for this was to increase at- 
tendance at the performances and while 



at the same time creating art and pro- 
fessional-level theatre on our stige. Dur- 
ing the fall semester. Ensemble Theatre 
put on one of their most successful mu- 
sicals, "Grease". In the spring semester 
they presented a "straight" play — 
meaning pure drama — "Getting Out". 




ENSEMBLE THEATRE. Front Row: Valerie Jean Andruk, James Curtin, Lyn Jenkins, Sally Anne Ward, Donna K. Schiavo, Donna-Jean 
Foster, John P. Muldoon. Second Row: Serri Noyes, Shalaan Cowart, Melani Wallace, Jennifer Condon, Stacey Fleming, Lorri Finnigan, 
Annette M. Moccia, Neil Bums, Denise Kelly, Peter Ashworth, Barbara DiMartino, Wendy Murphy. Back Row: Gene Reiber, Erin Clinton, 
Heidi Eklund, Michael Leonard, Kevin LaVille, Keith Eric Bernard, Scott Gagnon, Christohper Mather. 



115 



"Hear Me Now 
Listen To Me Later 



Forensics means "speaking for judge- 
n\ent/' and the Bridgewater team, head- 
ed by Professor Miskelly, is among the 
very best in the east. Founded by Prof. 
Miskelly in 1969, the Forensics Society 
has fared well in competition with MIT, 
Harvard, Boston College, Cornell, the 
Air Force Academy, and UCLA. The 
team is a member of Pi Kappa Delta, the 



honor society for forensic competitors 
from four-year colleges and universities. 
"It's great to see students give a brillant 
performance," says Professor Miskelly. " 
That's what makes it worthwhile to be 
involved. It's also satisfying to see stu- 
dents improve, to watch them become 
confident and successful." 






FORENSIC SOCIETY. Karen Foley, Christopher Mather, Karen Modano, and AnnMarie Weir. 



116 



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CLUBS1989 



"Let the Games Begin 



The Game Club is one of the newest club challenging games like chess, billards, 
on-capus at Bridgewater State College, and many others. A small group pro- 
Founded by Ed Wise and several other vided the nucleus for a successful first 
students, the club provides a forum for year for the Game Club, 
its members and other students to play 




GAME CLUB. Front Row: John Gay, Glenn Chandler, Ed Wise, Chris Collins, Bob Coughlin, Neil Seymour. Back Row: Derick Bodamer, 
David Pereira, Joseph Baldwin, Jeff Wade. 



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The International Club is a very popular 
club on the Bridgewater State College 
campus. Students needn't be an inter- 
national student to be a part of the club. 
All students are welcome to join to learn 
about the different cultures from around 
the world. The club held it's annual 



"International Night" in the early spring. 
The night featured dishes from different 
countries that the students made them- 
selves. After the dinner, they had a talent 
show that the members of the club and 
performers from around the area par- 
ticipated in. 




INTERNATIONAL CLUB, Front Row: Catherine Ostler, Mahes Wimala Suria, Eileen Doyle, Phinda Ncala, Naoe Suzuki, Angela Mercer, 
Kate Brice. Second Row: Crystal Hall, Heather Millar, Emma Nixon, Helena Rodrigues, Oguz Aglamaz, Minh-Hoang Vu, Carla Silva, Meng 
Feng Tan. Back Row: Tang Siu Ling, Eduardo Nettle, Christopher Carswell, Denise Semedo, Robyn McElroy. 



118 



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The Bridgewater State College Karate This year the Karate club held a 50/50 

Club was formed in 1980 by its present Raffle and a Candy Sale to help pay for 

instructor Sensei Tone Resende. The their trip to the Island of Sao Miguel in 

club has made the college proud with the Azores (Portugal), to attend an in- 

their numerous wins in tournaments on ternationally ranked tournament, 
campus and in the New England area. 




Karate Club 





KARATE CLUB. Front Row: Kelley Le Cain, Lori A. DiDonato, Craig DeMeko, Sherri Noyes, Rosann Kozlowski. Back Row: Brian Davies, 
Geoffrey Lelliott, Wolf, Kevin Elderd. 



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National Student Speech, Language, and and Audiology. The Bridgewater Chap- 
Hearing Association is a nationwide or- ter conducts different activities related to 
ganization that is open to students that these fields and provides a scholarship 
are majoring or mmoring in Commu- for a junior in the major during their 
nication Disorders and plan to go into senior year, 
the fields of Speech Language Pathology 




NSSLHA. Yront Row: Janice Wightman, Diane Hurley, Andrea Cieri. Back Row: Kathy Pereira, Claire Malliaroudakis, Lori-Ann Tunewicz, 
Kathleen Black, Nanci Burgio. 



120 



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Read My Lips 



The Poltical Science Club helps to pre- intriguing lectures, and educational field 

pare its men\bers for the future by pro- trips. The Poltical Science Club is ded- 

viding many opportunties to engage in icated to its student members to com- 

discussions of social and political issues, munity service projects. 







POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB. Christopher Perra, Joseph Lange, Patrick J. Pearce, and Charles Konstantinidis. 



121 




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Society for the Advancement of Man- 
agement Science (SAMS) is a club where 
you can learn while doing! They give 
hands on experience for the business 
world. This year, they had a Celtics and 
Patriots raffle which one of our lucky 
Bridge water students was able to win. 



SAMS also had several guest speakers. 
Ray Shamie came to our lovely campus 
and also Paula Gold, the Massachusetts 
Secretary for Consumer Affairs. SAMS 
also had a "Dress for Success" lecture for 
all of our executives-to-bes. 






STUDENTS FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MANAGEMENT SCIENCE. Front Row: Michelle Staples, Phil lacobacci, Cathy Calcina. 
Back Row: Patricia McKean, Diane Jones, Prof. Carleton Donchess, Melissa Meallo. 



122 



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CLUBS1 989 



Bring a Suitcase! 



Having been founded in 1986, Sutdent 
Alumni Relations Committee (SARC) 
has worked hard to maintain their goal 
in promoting pride, spirit, and tradition 
and has succeeded very well. Among 
traditional events SARC has held its an- 
nual Suitcase Dance, which was a huge 



AnySAfl£L 



success. They also continued in their tra- 
dition to sponsor buses for away games 
for football and basketball. The club has 
also held their annual tuition raffle and 
sponsored the winning prizes for Home- 
coming and Heritage Day Floats. 





a * 

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STUDENT ALUMNI RELATIONS COUNCIL. Front Row: Jeannette Marmen, Mary Staffier, Linda Dutra, Michele Donnelly, Dianne 
Carter Robyb Gaynor, Marci Skiddell. Second Row: Jeanne Burke, Elaine Dundon, Jennifer Tomaso, Kim Grande, Jennifer MeWo^Back Row: 
Jen Smith Tammy Arcano, Derek Savage, Jane Taris, Beth deLalla. Not Pictured: Marjorie Sardella, Mamie Cunniff, Beth Donahue. 



123 



It is the belief of Bridgewater State Col- 
lege that student participation in all as- 
pects of campus life is an integral part of 
the educational process. Students are en- 
couraged to become involved, providing 
the student perspective in the planning 
and implementation of campus activities. 
One of the best ways to get involved is 
through the Student Government Asso- 
ciation. Through the payment of the 
SGA fee, all students become de facto 



members of the SGA. Monies from the 
fee are used to fund various clubs, or- 
ganizations, and projects. Clubs and or- 
ganizations are set up by groups inter- 
ested in certain areas and these groups 
apply to the SGA for official recogniton, 
funding, and usage of campus facilities. 
Types of clubs and organizations funded 
by the SGA range from the Afro- 
American Society to the Comment to the 
Ensemble Theatre. 



Student Government Association 




STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE BOARD. Marcia Medeiros, President, Craig C. Hall, Chris Concheri, Edmund 
Ward, and F. Scott Longo, Student Trustee. 



124 




CLUBS1989 




There are many projects which are fund- 
ed through the SGA fee and assisted or 
sponsored by the auspices of the SGA. 
The book exchanges, legal advice, the 
College Day Care Center, Homecoming, 
and the Yearbook are among the many 
projects that the SGA supports. The 
SGA, like the U.S. federal system, con- 
sists of three branches: the executive 
branch, the legislative branch and the 
judicial branch. The legislative branch is 



named the Congress and consists of 21 
members. Members of the executive and 
legislative branches are elected yearly 
through a vote of the student body. 
Members of judicial branch are appoint- 
ed by the SGA President with the advice 
and consent of the Congress. Regular 
meetings of the SGA are held weekly on 
Tuesdays at 6:00 p.m. in the Campus 
Center Council Chambers. 




STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION CONGRESS. Front Row: Suzanne Sherwood, Christopher Perra, Kevin Gaffny, Patrick J. 
Pearce, Edward J. Tighe, Lisa J. Cleary. Back Row: Ron Andre, Darryl Bolduc, Joseph Lange, Curtis J. Landsberger. 



125 



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The Student Court is an important part 
of the Student Government Association. 
As its judical branch, the Student Court 
hear cases that violates the Student Gov- 
ernment Constitution. The Chief Justice 
of the Court also has the responsibility of 
swearing all new members of the Ex- 



ecutive Branch, the Executive Board, and 
the Legislative Branch, the Congress. 
Just like the Supreme Court of the Unit- 
ed States' federal system, it is the check 
on the Student Government Association 
college governance system. 




STUDENT COURT. Anthony Mavilia, Curtis Howard, Charles Konstantinidis, Chief Justice, and Jackie Holmes. 



126 



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All Life Is Precious 



The Students for Life club wants to ed- critical, but to act as a source of infor- 

ucate the college community here at mation. The club donates to the Make-a 

Bridgewater on issues like alternatives to Wish Foundation, a non-profit organi- 

abortion, rights of the handicapped and zation for terminally ill children, with 

elderly, and other pro-life issues. The the proceeds of their fundraisers, 
club does not want to be aggressive or 




STUDENTS FOR LIFE. Curtis Landsberger, Paula Satinoff, and Paul Lambert. Not Pictured: Gabby Brunori, Chris Aulenbach, Meg 
Doherty, Jeff Tucker, Joanr\e Anderson. 



127 




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This year, the Bridgewater State College 
Transit Service took on a new look with 
the new busses. The once familiar dirty 
red and white busses were replaced at 
last with modem and clean busses. The 
Transit Service started in January 1984 in 
an effort to increase the mobility of the 



students at no charge. Shuttles run from 
the Hill, the Commuter lot, to the Cam- 
pus Plaza, as well as to Brockton. The 
Transit system relies on the hard work 
and dedication of the students behind 
the wheels of our modified 
"limousines". 



Transit Service 




128 



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CLUBS1 989 



Come A Long Way, 
Baby! 



Did you know there was a club for wom- 
en on campus? The Women's Center has 
its home base on the third floor of the 
Campus Center and is an information 
center available to female students on 
campus. They held meetings with the 
Women's Advisory Committee and pub- 
lish a newsletter, "The Current". During 



the month of March, which was Wom- 
en's History Month, the members had a 
display in the library, with a reception 
afterwards. The Women's Center and its 
supporters were instrumental in imple- 
menting a women's studies minor on the 
Bridgewater Campus. 




WOMEN'S CENTER. Front Row: Elfrieda Gershman, Francine Quaglio, Cheryl Lees. Back Row: Jenni Peterson, Ceil McDonald Sylvia 
Keyes, Tammi Hough, Lee Dunne. ^ 



129 



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WBIM RADIO 




WBIM RADIO. Front Row: Ronli Berlinger, Lee Stanford, Lindi Nordin, Chris Smalley, Susan McDonald, Michael Crowley, Chuck 
Zizzo. Second Row: Neil Burns, Brian Gordon, Rob Gimler, Rich Scanlon, John R. Bums III, Herb Lemon, Stephanie Yetner. Back Row: 
Nancy Wade, Katy Gallagher, Caitlin Andrews, Peter Doyle, Geoffrey Wade, John Curtin, Amy Hill, Doreen Duarte. 



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CLUBS1989 



On the Air in Bridgewater . . . 

WBIM Radio is voice of Bridgewater State College, here to It is rur\ by Bridgewater students who work in staff positions 

provide students with an opportunity to gain knowledge and similiar to those of U.S. major radio stations, 

experience in all facets of radio broadcasting. WBIM is known for its progressive music format, often 

The studios of WBIM (91.5 FM Stereo) are located on the playing hits and bands long before they appear on the national 

third floor of the Adrian Rondileau Campus Center and is on charts. It is a "breaking ground" for all new types of music. 
the air daily from 9 a. m to 12 midnight. 





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132 



reek letter organizations were making a comeback at colleges across the nation 
and the Bridgewater State College had its own revival of interest in the 
"Greek" way of living. Opportunities to make close long lasting friends is what 
impressed BSC students most about the Greek lifestyle. They joined already 
established fraternities and sororities and created new ones. For example, 
Sigma Pi and Theta Chi were among the new national fraternities that came to 
BSC. Alpha Upsilon officially returned to the campus. Local sorority Lambda 
Gamma Chi became the national Phi Sigma Sigma sorority. Other fraternities 
and sororities such as Sigma Chi, Gamma Phi Beta, Phi Pi Delta, Tau Alpha 
Kappa and Delta Psi Rho simply got bigger and better. 




GREEKS 




Pamela Grimes 

Greeks Editor 









133 



PREVIEW GREEKS 






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BSC GOES GREEK! 

Suddenly, being a Greek was "in" again. It seemed that everyone 
"RUSHED" out to join a fraternity or sorority, and "PLEDGED" their new 
found friends that they would be their best "BROTHER" or "SISTER". It 
was an interesting year for the Greeks, and to people that becanie a part of 
the Greek system, it was all "GREEK" to them. 

AT 

The oldest and most notorious fraternity. Alpha Upsilon, was readmitted 
into the Greek community on probation. On Page 136 

2X 
Sigma Chi, the first national fraternity on campus, simply just got bigger 
and more successful. On Page 137 

sn 

One of the newest fraternities, Sigma Pi provided a "brotherhood that 
speaks for itself." On Page 138 

0X 
With colors of red and white, Theta Chi seemed right at home at BSC as 
they were the newest national fraternity. On Page 139 

AH? 

Flying high. Alpha Eta Rho is the only professional aviation fraternity. On 
Page 140 

Phi Pi Delta, the first local coed fraternity on campus, celebrated their 26 
year history. On Page 141 

TAK 

Tau Alpha Kappa, the newest coed fraternity, relies on its motto, 
"Teamwork, Athletics, and Kinship". On Page 142 

A new and revitalized Delta Psi Rho strived for the gold. On Page 143 

r$B 

As the oldest sorority on campus, the Gamma girls continued to show that 
they definitely do it "Beta". On Page 144 

Lambda Gamma Chi "aimed high" as they went national as Phi Sigma 
Sigma. On Page 145 



134 



TIMELINE: 



Having so many different Greeks on one campus, it's interesting to know when 
these fraternities and sororities came on campus. Did they come out of the 
woodwork or wher»e they always here? Here's a brief dateline of the Greek 
organizations if you were wondering. 



1953 

Alpha Upsilon was formed. 

1963 

Phi Pi Delta was formed. 

1978 

Phi Pi Delta went coed. 

1983 

Greek Council was formed. 

April 1983 

Pi Upsilon Pi was installed as an official chapter of 
Sigma Chi. 

October 1983 

Kappa Phi Omega was formed. 

Spring 1987 

Lamda Gamma Chi was formed. 



Spring 1987 

Kappa Phi Omega becomes a colony of Gamma Phi 

Beta. 

April 1987 

Delta Psi Rho was formed. 

May 1987 

Tau Alpha Kappa was formed. 

November 1987 

Gamma Phi Beta installed as an official chapter. 

January 1989 

Thota Chi was installed as a colony. 

February 1989 

Lambda Gamma Chi installed as an official chapter of 

Phi Sigma Sigma. 



GREEK COUNCIL 




Greek Council. Front Row: Jeff Malmberg, Lyn Maney, Eddie Paletsky, Patricia Kerber, Todd Hollister, Scott Deeter, Robyn M. Baker. Second Row 
Enn McDermott, Deborah Ranelli, Tina Hennigan, Sue Fer\r\ell, Edward East, Jeffrey Bruno, Michael Gorman, Anthony Regan, Jennifer Bates Back 
Row: Annmarie Weir, Maureen P. Doherty, Deborah Orlando, Denise Murphy, Jacquelyn Remillard. 



135 



ALPHA UPSILON 




Alpha Upsilon Fraternity. Front Row: Dana Svendsen, Kevin Coyne, Dan Duggan, Jeff Malmberg, 
Jeff Bruno, Jim Rooney. Back Row: Scott Saccoach, Edward East, Jeff Sutherland, Eric Bartlett, Kevin 
Cobb. 



AY 




THE LAST TIME 

Alpha Upsilon appeared in the Yearbook was in the 1986 Passages Yearbook. 



Established in 1953, Alpha Upsilon is the 
oldest fraternity on the Bridgewater 
State College campus. After the notorious in- 
cident involving a pig during Greek Week 
1987, they were banned from Greek Council. 

In Spring 1989, they petitioned the Greek 
Council to be readmitted. They were readmit- 
ted, but only on a probationary basis. The 
fraternity was to be monitored for good be- 
havior all semester and if they were unan- 
imously accepted at the end of the year by the 
Greek Council, they will again become a full 
voting member. 

The Alpha brothers have started out on the 
right foot by donating teddy bears to Heaven's 
Children which is a charity for terminally ill 
children. 

Leighann McGovern 



136 



SIGMA CHI 




IX 



Sigma Chi Fraternity. Front Row: James M. Rockett, Brendan C. Kelliher, Shaggy, Steve Lanciani, 
Terry Durod, Dave Savaria, Paul McPeak, Manuel Carvalho, Einstein D. Thomas, Jerry Rymill. 
Second Row: John Constantine, David S. Ambrose III, Vincent Femald, Tom Martin, Paul Ness, 
Mike Cox, Dave DeVincentis, Jim Hennemann, Jeff Valin, Bill Lawrence, Doug Eckelkamp III. Back 
Row: Greg Sheedy III, Glenn Doulette, Bob Ames, Matt Spiewakowski, Eric Loring, Eric Weiss, Rick 
Jacob, Tom Magee, Tyrone Paletski, Jared Pearl. 



The Theta Zeta Chapter of Sigma Chi was 
installed at Bridgewater State College 
on April 23, 1983. Sigma Chi is the first na- 
tional fraternity at Bridgewater State College. 
The idea of bringing Sigma Chi to BSC 
began when members of the local fratenity. Pi 
Upsilon Pi, met some Sigma Chi brothers dur- 
ing spring break in Florida. They then con- 
tacted the national headquarters in Evanston, 
Illinois, who sent representatives to BSC to 
work with prospective brothers. Within a year. 
Pi Upsilon Pi became Sigma Chi. 

Sigma Chi involvement in both the college 
and the chapter has earned them the Peterson 
Significant Chapter Award every year. 
Leighann McGovern 




WITH THE EX-BEAR 

Vinny Femald, president of Sigma Chi, and his fraternity brother have some fun 
during the Homecoming Parade. 



137 



SIGMA PI 




Sigma Pi Fraternity. Front Row: Meersy, John Gilson, Joey Silveira. Scott A. Moulton, Cosimo 
D'Elia, Michael C. Gorman, Jim LaPrad. Second Row: Paul D'Alfonso, Chris Concheri, Guy DeWolf, 
Todd Florence, Nick Prompanas. Back Row: Eric Frost, Pat Pearce, Wayne Labonte, Mike Keel, Mark 
Miller, Bob Gardner, Brian R. Flannigan, Anthony Regan. 




T 



PUTTING ON THE 

finishing touches on their float are the members of Sigma Pi as they prepare for the 
Homecoming Parade. 



heir motto is "Brotherhood speaks for 
itself." That's the feeling you get when 
you them talk about their fraternity. Sigma Pi 
received its charter in Spring 1988 as the Eta 
Zeta chapter and they have been very busy 
this year. 

They have been busy with a Homecoming 
recycling can drive for St. Luke's Hospital. 
Fraternity members picked up cans after tail- 
gating and delivered them to the hospital and 
proceeds went for a hospital's helicopter pad. 
They have participated in various mixers with 
other Greek organizations and football games 
for entertainment. 

The frat has also sponsored AIDS awareness 
week throughout the campus and hope to 
make it an annual event. The Sigma Pi broth- 
ers won second place in the Greek games. 

"Brotherhood" does speak for itself. 
Pam Grimes 



138 



THETA CHI 




ex 



Theta Chi Fraternity. Front Row: Kevin Caulfield, Sean "Gator" Gately, Jay Hill, Kary Shumway, 
Ron Pratt, Tim Campbell, David Allen, Peter Thomas. Second Row: Dave Lenti, Kenny Segal, Robert 
Bry, Chris Oliveira, Tony LaCourse, Paul Cangiano, Robert Patriquin, Joseph Lange, Tim O'Brien. 
Back Row: Kenneth W. Moore, Dwight Groom, Paul Reilly, Ed Wise, Christian Pease, Peter 
Atherton, Scott Kramer, Dale Reed. 



T 

I beta Chi is a national fraternity that was 

■ founded April 10, 1856 at Norwich Uni- 
versity. Bridgewater's colony of Theta Chi was 
officially formed on January 28, 1989. 

Tony LaCourse, the president, heard about 
the fraternity from a brother at the Univ. of 
Georgia over the summer. He got some of his 
friends interested, and they then formed Theta 
Chi here at BSC. 

The brothers' main purpose is to lend a 
"helping hand" to those in need. To start with, 
they helped out at the 1988 Open House for 
prospective students and the Senior Citizens 
Christmas Dinner in Hanover. Theta Chi's 
community service project for the spring se- 
mester was participation in the Walk for Hun- 
ger for the homeless in Boston. 
Leighann McGovern 




MAKING A STATEMENT 

at their installation ceremony are Theta Chi brothers Peter Thomas, Jay Hill, Kary 
Shumway and Chris Oliveira. 



139 



ALPHA ETA RHO 




Alpha Eta Rho Fraternity. Front Row: Julie Deschenes, Stacey Smith, Joanne Staff, Lance Kolb, 
Brian McCormack, Nelson Ortiz, Lisa Bowman. Second Row: Jim Kieran, Janet Moore, Allen Lucas, 
Allison MacPhadden, Christopher Bogdan, Kirk Niehoff, Patricia Kerber, Sheryl Rogers, Ron 
Benham. Third Row: Mark Foster, Darryl Bolduc, James HUister, James Boutter, Geoffrey Lelliott, 
Michael Perry Charlene Brezinski, Stephen Frati, Laurie Poirier. Back Row: Joseph King, Ron Andre, 
Paul Graceffa, Neil Seymour, Tony DeStefano, Andy Intrieri, Andy Gibson, Scott Deeter. 



AHP 




YOU'RE CRUSHING MY HEAD! 

Alpha Eta Rho brothers Tony DeStefano, Kirk Niehoff, Scott Deeter, Lance Kolb, Ron 
Andres, and Joe King have fun at one of their parties. 



Alpha Eta Rho is an international pro- 
fessional aviation fraternity that is 
open to all men and women who are in- 
terested in the aviation field. The Phi Deta 
Sigma chapter was formed at Bridgewater in 
1983 and started out with twelve members 
and has built its way up to forty active mem- 
bers. 

AHP takes part in Federal Aviation Asso- 
ciation seminars and is an active sponsor of 
the Special Olympics. They raised four hun- 
dred dollars and helped with scoring at the 
bowling tourmament for Special Olympics. 

Many of the alumni have gone on to very 
rewarding careers in the aviation industry, 
such as airline pilots, military pilots, air traffic 
controllers, and upper-level management po- 
sitions with airlines. 

Leighann McGovern 



140 



PHI PI DELTA 




Phi Pi Delta Fraternity. Front Row: Jimmy Massari, Lisa Apovian, Laura Pascarella, Erin 
McDermott, Ror\ Ford. Second Row: Dave White, Gretchen Yoder, Lyn Maney, Kirsten Egersheim, 
Thom Grabau, Jennifer Bates. Back Row: Mike "Zeke" Zeoli, Jeff Goldman, Eddie Carballo II, Peter 
Schwartz. Not Pictured: Dan Darcy, Herb Lemon, John Wagner, Sean Harris, Dean Tello, Dave 
Powers. 



M 

I I aving celebrated their 25th Anniver- 
■ * sary last year. Phi Pi Delta is the oldest 
coed fraternity on campus. It started out as an 
all male fraternity in 1963 and became coed in 
1978 because of declining membership. 

The fraternity's main purpose is to bring 
together people of diverse interests and back- 
grounds in a social setting to pursue a com- 
mon goal. Several social gatherings lightened 
yp the year for fraternity members. 

Phi Pi Delta also volunteered their services 
to the community. The faculty and students of 
Burrill Avenue Building knew them by the 
coffee they bring to sell in the mornings. Fra- 
ternity members sold and delivered colorful 
red and white balloons for a happier St. Val- 
entine's Day for BSC students. 
Pamela Grimes 




CLOSE FRIENDSHIPS 

are the hallmark of greek fraternities and sororities. Phi Pi Deltans Lisa Apovian and 
Jennifer Bates have a great time while doing a bake sale. 



141 



TAU ALPHA KAPPA 







Tau Alpha Kappa Fraternity. Yront Row: Todd Hollister, Cindi-Lou Sanguedolce, Bob Limbo, 
Vincent Petrillo, John Morash, Brian Bishop, Robert V. Perry Jr. Second Row: Dana C. Cutter, Ray 
Puglisi, Janet Lord, Scott Murphy, Karen Alfonso, Carolyn Tetreault, David A. Smith. Third Row: 
Henry DeMello, Robbyn Leach, Jill Marsden, Annmaria Bonos, Sue Brangan, Nina Del Negro, Sean 
McSherry, James J. Sahady Jr., Helen McGavin, Melissa A. Souza, Ellen Yezukevich. Back Row: Pam 
Patenaude, Adam Levin, Brian Buckley, Peter Jessiman, Joanne Bruneau, Sean Crump, Sal Zerilli, 
Mike Wood, Rich Sumlon, Donna Phillips. 



TAK 




TAK HAPPY! 

Having a great 
Phillips. 



The coed fraternity of Tau Alpha Kappa 
was founded in May 1987, making TAK 
one of the youngest local fraternities. The 
motto and backbone of TAK: Teamwork, Ath- 
letics, and Kinship becomes evident through 
its accomplishments and public service. 

Being winners of the 1988 Greek Day 
Olympics and the first runner-up of the 1987 
Heritage Day parade showed their successes. 
For the past two years, the students at BSC 
have been offered a chance to donate blood. 
The American Red Cross, Tau Alpha Kappa, 
and other Greek organizations have made this 
gift of life possible to the community and 
student body. 

To omit the social aspects of this fraternity 
would be a crime. TAK's social activities, par- 
ties, and mixers with other fraterni- 
ties/sororities and organizations have become 
the most notorious on campus. 
Pamela Grimes 



time together are Joanne Bruneau, Jacqui Remillard, and Donna 



142 



DELTA PSI RHO 




AJjP 



Delta Psi Rho Sorority. Front Row: Mary Ellen Kelleher, Sue Medeiros, Wendy Blackwell, Darlene 
Blanchard, Katherine Day, Sherie Johansen, Deborah Ranelli. Second Row: Ann-Marie Flanagan, 
Tracey Bennett, Jill Marie Johnson, Christine Bonnell, Mary Fisco, Kim Antonio, Tina Hennigan, 
Fredia D. Davis. Back Row: Sue Fennell, Susan DiNocco, Kirsten Hunt, Kelly O'Neil, Andrea 
Meninno, Anne Lan\b. 



n Spring 1987, Delta Psi Rho was founded 

at BSC by thirteen sisters. Since eleven of 
the thirteen sisters graduated in the spring of 
1988, the new sisters have strived to continue 
to be a successful sorority. 

They have had several fundraisers which 
include having a car wash, selling coffee and 
muffins at Burrill, singing grams at Christmas, 
and selling flowers and candy for Saint Val- 
entine's Day. The young women of Delta Psi 
Rho donate one hundred dollars to the "Wish 
Kids" foundation every year and as commu- 
nity service, and they volunteer their time at a 
local nursing home in Bridgewater. 

They planned to set up a one hundred 
dollar scholarship program for incoming 
freshman. As their new goal Delta Psi Rho 
hopes to become a national sorority in the 
near future. 

Leighann McGovern 




LIFE BEGINS AT DELTA 

At Delta Psi Rho, that is. Here Katy Hennessey, Kim Antonio, Chrissy DiMaria, Sue DiNocco, 
Kelly O'Neil, and Tina Hennigan wait anxiously for the HorT\ecoming Parade to begin. 



143 



GAMMA PHI BETA 




Gamma Phi Beta Sorority. Front Row: Ramona LeClair, Dinneen Diette, Erin Onos, Kim Molle, 
Elaine Doherty, Lynn Madden. Back Row: Barbara McCabe, Hannah Narkon, Kimi Cook, Maura 
Powers, Julie Flynn, Pamela McDonough, Paula Demers, Felicia Salsa, Lori Lind, Terri Crobsy, 
Patricia Taylor. 



roB 




LET'S DO IT BETA' 

Gamma Phi Beta sisters proved that they were having a great time at the Home- 
coming Parade. 



I MHH amma Phi Beta Sorority has an 
^^_^ unique place in Bridgewater State 
College's greek history as it was both first local 
and national sorority. 

The Epsilon Eta Chapter was officially born 
on November 22, 1987, as the former local 
sorority. Kappa Phi Omega, completed an ini- 
tiation process begun in 1986 to achieve af- 
filiation with the national sorority. 

Kappa Phi Omega was established in the 
spring of 1983. In fall of 1986, they inves- 
tigated the possibility of national affiliation, 
and in the spring of 1987 the sisters of Kappa 
Phi Omega petitioned Gamma Phi Beta. 

In 1988-89, the sisters participated in the 
Red Cross Blood Drive and also held bake 
sales as fundraisers. Their philanthropic proj- 
ect is Camp Sechalt, a home for underpriv- 
ileged children. 

Pamela Grimes 



144 



PHI SIGMA SIGMA 




Phi Sigma Sigma Sorority. Front Row: Annmarie Weir, Lisa Walters, Melanie Maloney, Kathleen 
Black, Kate Carney, Jennifer Tomaso, Emily La Valley. Second Row: Shannon Smith, Susan Krip- 
pendorf, Kim Bryan, Margaret Lenehan, Kelly Chase, Nikki Constantine, Laura Drouin, Sarah 
Harrison-Cook, Leah Musto, Cynthia Holt. Back Row: Cindy Leonard, Sandy Gentile, Michelle 
Mitchell, Debbie Baker, Cathleen Warren, Maria Duganiero, Marcia Medeiros, Amy McLaughlin, 
Clare Cahill. 



Lamda Gamma Chi goes national!! The 
sisters of Lamda Gamma Chi achieved 
their long awaited goal of being affiliated with 
a national sorority. 

Their pledging process took nearly a year 
until February 11, 1989 when they were of- 
ficially installed as sisters of Phi Sigma Sigma. 
The sorority's main purposes are to promote 
sisterhood, scholarship, and community ser- 
vice. 

This year. Phi Sigma Sigma sisters raised 
money for the National Kidney Foundation 
and held a canned food drive for the home- 
less. They received the letter from the state 
commending them for their canned food 
drive. They also helped out with the Greek 
Council's annual blood drive for the American 
Red Cross. 

Pamela Grimes 




AIM HIGH! 

Sisters of Lambda Gamma Chi sorority became an offical chapter of the national 
sorority during its installation ceremony on February 11, 1989. 



145 





146 



eady. Set, Go!" Somewhere, today, there is a BSC Bears athletic team 
getting ready to give it their all. During the academic year, there is a 
game played almost every day by one of the Bridgewater's varisty, 
club, and intermural teams. Over 50% of student population 
participate in Bridgewater's atheltic program, making it one of the 
most popular programs here at BSC. Being an athlete is not easy — 
balancing school, work, social life and family with the hectic game 
schedules and almost daily practices is often difficult. However, 
participation in the athletic program makes a definite impression on 
the BSC Athlete's Bridgewater experience. 



SPORTS 




NEW 

and 

DIFFERENT 



Paul Cournoyer 

Sports Editor 









147 




148 



FOOTBALL 




T 



he 1988 Bridgewater State College football season was 
highlighted by the return of head coach Peter Maz- 
zaferro who entered his 20th season at the helm of the 
Bears. The BSC season climaxed with a 20-3 win over 
Mass. Maritime Academy in the annual Cranberry 
Bowl game, their first since 1983. The BSC defense 
was the backbone of the team all season finishing 6th 
in the nation for team defense allowing only 186.1 
yards per game to the opposition. Freshmen defensive 
tackle Bill Macri from Randolph, MA, with 68 tackles 
and linebacker Brian Jones from Maiden, MA, with 58 
tackles sparked the Bridgewater Bears in their de- 
fensive play all year. 



%/\% 




1988-89 Football Cheerleaders. FRONT ROW: Honey Ross. SECOND 
ROW: Denise Semedo, Kelly Monahan, Robin Cook. THIRD ROW: 
Heather Haynes, Kelly Barnes, Pam Jordan, Jody Littlefield, Betsy 
Moran, Marie Hunter, Laurie Dunham, Lisha Brightman. BACK ROW: 
Darlene Malecki, Dana Salmon. 



149 



SCOREBOARD 




BSC OPP 1 


PLYMOUTH STATE 


3 


25 


UMASS-BOSTON 


6 





WORCESTER STATE 


7 


14 


FITCHBURG STATE 


28 





SMU 


9 


22 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


23 


14 


WESTFIELD STATE 


16 


21 


MASS. MARITIME 


20 


3 


W.N.E.C. 


34 





SEASON RECORD 


:5-4 






1988-89 Football Team. FRONT ROW: Tom Egan, Carlos Oliveira, Jim Thomson, Matt Collins, Ed 
Sopp, Rich Rao, Brian Jones, Tim Philpott, Jerry McGrath, Chris Patota, Peter Maroon, Keith Farley, 
Steve Ditria. SECOND ROW: Brett Cohen, Bill Macri, Jim Sperzel, Mike Dunn, Derek Wassel, Paul 
Burke, Sean Frazier, Jeff Lane, Mike Lawson, Chris Gallagher, David Adams, Jim Mello, Mark 
Sarkisian. THIRD ROW: Sean Tiernan, Kevin Marino, Rich Grossman, Mark Goldman, Mike King, 
Todd Brown, Mike Peltier, Bob Brackett, Sean Feeney, Rob Charters, Chris Concheri, John Rowe. 
FOURTH ROW: Jeff Suttie, Chuck Lindberg, Rick Weinhold, Doug Benoit, Matt Jardin, Frank 
DiCenso, Eric Gorby, Kevin Sadowski, Glenn Gonsalves, Jorge Orta, Sean Connor, David 
Pinkham. FIFTH ROW: Tim Kurtz, Sean Dennehy, Ed Shea, Mike Henrick, Jim Sweeney, Gerry 
O'Brien, Doug Hight, Marc Angelini, Mel Harris, Mike Dockery. BACK ROW: Mike Kenney 
(assistant coach), John Fourner (assistant coach), Peter Mazzaferro (head coach), Joe Verria 
(assistant coach). Rich Florence (assistant coach). 



150 




151 




# ^\0*^ 



1 ii*^'%a 



SCOREBOARD 



BSC OPP 

WPI 2 

SOUTHERN MAINE 3 3 

WHEATON 1 

BENTLEY 2 

PINE MANOR 4 

SMU 2 1 

KEENE STATE 1 1 

FRAMINGHAM STATE 3 

PLYMOUTH STATE 3 2 

WORCESTER STATE 2 

WESTFIELD STATE 4 3 

SALEM STATE 1 

ASSUMPTION 3 1 

ST. MICHEAL'S 2 

HTCHBURG STATE 6 O 
NCAA REGIONAL TOURNEY 
@ CORTLAND STATE, NY 

WILLL«iM SMITH 1 2 

1988 MASCAC CHAMPIONS: 5-0 
SEASON RECORD: 11-3-2 



•# 







152 



FIELDHOCKEY 



T 



he Lady Bears earned a trip to the NCAA Northeast 
Regional tournament this year, nnarking the 10th year 
in a row the women have competed in post season 
play. Under first-year coach Sue Crosby, BSC went 
undefeated in MASCAC play (5-0) and ended the 
regular season ranked # 1 in New England. Bridge- 
water looked to juniors Kathy McGough (14 points) of 
Swansea, Ma, and Andrea Erickson (10 points) of 
Swansea, Ma, for most of their scoring. Both players 
were named to the MASCAC all conference team. In 
goal, the Lady Bears got an outstanding effort from 
freshman Kate Sullivan of Medfield, Ma, who had 
seven shutouts as goalie during the season. 




1988-89 Field Hockey Team. FRONT ROW: Margaret Marini, Marilyn 
Gomes, Tricia CuUen, Andrea Erickson, Erika Hardiman, Kathy 
McGough, Michelle Magner, Kate Carney, Kelly Byrne, Kathleen 
Moore, Martha Wall, Melinda Moleon, Ronda Davis. BACK ROW: 
Maggie Shields, Scott Azulay, Kathy Wall, Linette Villegas, Nicole 
Brunelle, Cynthia Costa, Randi Cote, Cheryl Brauner, Kate Sullivan, 
Cheryl Wood, Joanne Smith, Meg Doherty, Roberta Taglieri, Dav/n 
Lanciani, Sandra Bainton, Kelly Martin, Sue Crosby (head coach), 
Cheryl Hitchings (assistant coach). 



153 



MEN'S 



s 



o 



c 



c 



E 



R 



B 



ridgewater Men's Soccer Team had their finest season 
since 1979 and tied both Salem State and North 
Adams State for second place honors in the MASCAC. 
First-year coach Dennis Lukens got solid perfor- 
mances from freshman striker Domingos Leal with 20 
pts from New Bedford, MA, and goalie Mike 
O'Connor from St. Albans, VT. Captain and stopper 
Nuno Melo from Taunton, MA, was named to the 
MASCAC all conference team. BSC set a record for 
most shutouts in a season with 9, including 5 in a row 
to end the year. 





1988-89 Men's Soccer Team. FRONT ROW: Daniel Kwash, Jeff Seeley, 
Dave Floeck, Mike Correia, Tim Carey (captain), Nuno Melo (captain), 
Nick Zeoli, Geoff Jumper, Frank Cunha, Derek Savage. BACK ROW: 
Paul Amarol (assistant coach), Tony LaCourse, Carlo Costa, Chris 
Joyce, Jim Daley, Brian Folkes, Joe Bonnaro, Carlo Uriuoli, Mike 
O'Connor, Andy Karparis, Mike Meers, Bill Richard, Jonathan Sikes, 
Domingos Leal, Dan Bourgery, Jeri Anderson, Dennis Lukens (head 
coach). 



154 





155 








m% - 





156 




SCOREBOARD 




BSC OPP 1 


HOLY CROSS 


2 


2 


BRANDEIS 


1 


2 


SOUTHERN MAINE 





3 


SALVE REGINA 


3 





ROGER WILLIAMS 


2 


1 


MASS. MARITIME 


1 





SMU 








UMASS-BOSTON 





3 


STONEHILL 





1 


SUFFOLK 


4 





NORTH ADAMS STAIE 





1 


FITCHBURG STATE 





2 


RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 


3 


2 


WORCESTER STATE 


5 





EASTERN NAZARENE 


4 





SALEM STATE 


1 





FRAMINGHAM STATE 


3 





WESTFIELD STATE 


1 





MASCAC RECORD: 5 


-2(2nd Place) 




SEASON RECORD: 10-6-2 





157 



SCOREBOARD 




BSC OFF 


SALEM STATE 


1 


WESTFIELD STATE 


1 


W.N.E.C. 


2 1 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


1 7 


COLBY 


1 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


2 1 


BRYANT COLLEGE 


1 2 


WPI 


3 


NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE 


1 8 


SOUTHERN MAINE 


3 


CURRY 


3 


REGIS 


4 


SALVE REGINA 


4 


STONEHILL 


1 


MASCAC RECORD: 


l-3(4th Place) 


SEASON RECORD: 6-8 





T llurf ' *^- *?. * 



158 



WOMEN'S 



s 



o 



c 



c 



E 



R 




A 



fter a 9-3 season in 1987, BSC coach Kathy Brophy 
with a young and inexperienced squad faced a very 
competitive and upgraded schedule heading into 
their second season of varsity play. The Lady Bears' 
record (6-8) was a deceiving one as five of their 
losses were decided by just one goal. A bright note 
of the year was the emergence of freshman Buffy 
Comeau with 20 pts. from Spencer, MA, who was 
the team's top offensive threat. Fullback Karen 
Calabrese from Dedham, MA, was also recognized 
for a solid year on defense by being named to the 
MASCAC all conference team. 




1988-89 Women's Soccer Team. FRONT ROW: Julie Deschenes, Maria 
Antoniou, Derri O'Rourke, Leslie Cotter (captain), Gina Cannoles 
(captain), Julie Dunn, Karen Calabrese, Christine Cleary, Patricia 
Comeau. BACK ROW: Andy Weiss (assistant coach), Kathy Brophy 
(head coach), Michele Barker, Tanja Petroni, Kara Kennedy, Tracey 
Kielty, Ellen Roberts, Michelle McCawley, Mario Montessi, Melissa 
Coding, Laurie Govoni, Ken Johnson, Jeannine Bonnayer. 



159 



CROSS COUNTRY 



T 



he cross country team went through a rebuilding year 
this past Fall with only five veterans back for Coach 
Ed Delgado. Of those five, three earned MASCAC all- 
conference honors: Norm Atchue from Falmouth, 
MA, Mel Gonsalves from East Falmouth, MA and 
Beth Mosher from Foxboro, MA. With a year of solid 
experience behind them and a new track facility ready 
for Spring, the 1989 squad will be one to catch. 




1988-89 Cross Country Team. Bill MacKinnon, Ed Delgado, Mike 
Washburn, John Galvin, Norm Atchue, Mel Gonsalves, Peter Barron, 
Phinda Neala, Mike Keanan, Dave Newman, Lori Fitts, Beth Mosher, 
Mimi Lannin, Julie Guilmette. 




160 




161 




162 



MEN'S 



BASKETBALL 



T 



he Bridgewater Bears finished the season with their 
second straight 15-11 winning season. They just fin- 
ished out running for an ECAC tournament bid as 
well. Forward Sean Carey for the second year in a row 
led the team in both scoring (15.5) and in rebounding 
(6.9) this past season. Both Carey and George An- 
derson made the second team of the MASCAC all 
conference team this year as well. The bears will be 
graduating six seniors from the squad but still have a 
solid nucleus returning next season led by Carey and 
freshman standout John Hickey. 




1988-89 Men's Basketball Team. FRONT ROW: Mike Saporito, Sean 
Conway, George Anderson, Chuck Jaehnig, John Dillman, Randy Col- 
lins, Sean Carey, Scott Ashworth. BACK ROW: Jorge Neves, Joe Farroba 
(Asst. Coach), Todd Steiman, Vagelis Theodorulakis, Jim Way, John 
Hickey, Bob Aho, Peter Toumigny, Keith Farley, Susan Sylvia, Mark 
Champagne (Head Coach). MISSING: Rob Pimental, Gary Young. 



163 





SCORFROARD 






BSC 


OPP 


Southern Maine 




53 


75 


Rhode Island College 
Suffolk 




81 
86 


83 
66 


Williams College Invitational 
Williams 72 


92 


Framingham State 
Babson 




65 
83 


56 
62 


Plymouth State (OT) 

Kean 
Upsala 
Kean College 
Westfield State 


72 
College Tournament 
79 
84 
91 


81 

68 
99 

75 


UMass/Boston 
Framingham State (OT) 
North Adams State 




81 
82 
74 


86 

72 
78 


S.M.U. 




74 


81 


Worcester State 




83 


66 


Nichols 




71 


64 


Salem State 




11 


79 


Fitchburg State 
Westfield State 




65 

82 


55 
11 


Framingham State 
North Adams State 




89 

73 


65 
85 


Eastern Nazarene 




92 


68 


Curry 
Worcester State 




81 
98 


64 
83 


Salem State (OT) 
Fitchburg State 




93 
88 


97 

55 


MASCAC RECORD 


.8-4 






Second Place 






SEASON RECORD: 


15-11 







164 




165 



WOMEN'S 



BASKETBALL 



T 



he Bridgewater Lady Bears finished the year with their 
seventh consecutive winning season, however, failed 
for the first time during that strech to gain a bid to a 
post-season tournament. The season itself was full of 
excitement and dazling performances by the team. 
Senior Lynn Malkasian finished her BSC career by 
becoming the third highest scorer ever (1,086 pts.). 
She led the women in both scoring (11.9 pts.) and in 
rebounding (8.0) this past season. Both Malkasian and 
Katrina Antonellis made the MASCAC all conference 
team (first and second team respectively) for Bridge- 
water this year. In addition to making the first team of 
the MASCAC all conference team Malkasian also 
made the NEWBA Coaches All Star team. The squad 
will only lose two players this year to graduation, 
making the Lady Bears a strong, experienced team to 
only build upon next year. 




1988-89 Women's Basketball Team. FRONT ROW: Lisa Orlandello, 
Katrina Antonellis, Kathy Malkasian, Lynn Malkasian, Kelly Scherber, 
Liane Bachant, Joanne Smith, Patricia Comeau. BACK ROW: Julie Hub- 
bard, Chris Joyce, Maggie Sheilds, Deb Hidenfelter, Lisa Weinberg, 
Laura Bellot, Connie DeVries, Winnie McGarry, Ronia Kobylanski, Ann 
Malinowski(assisi:ant coach), Judy Foster(head coach). 



166 




167 




168 




SCORFROARD 


BSC 


OPP 


Southern Maine 46 


85 


Rhode Island Collge 70 


62 


Eastern Nazarene 81 


58 


St. Joseph's 70 


87 


W.P.I. 63 


44 


Plymouth State 75 


58 


Emmanuel 55 


68 


Westfield State 67 


59 


UMmass/Boston 63 


38 


Framingham State 71 


59 


North Adams State 67 


22 


S.M.U. 58 


69 


W. Connecticut State 45 


60 


Worcester State 61 


49 


Salem State 58 


74 


Fitchburg State 68 


41 


Westfield State 69 


61 


Framingham State 91 


60 


North Adams State 90 


40 


Clark 57 


74 


Babson 57 


60 


Worcester State 69 


71 


Salem State 63 


74 


Fitchburg State 79 


54 


MASCAC RECORD: 9-3 




Second Place 




SEASON RECORD: 15-10 






169 



SCOREBOARD 






ESC 


OPP 


S.M.U. 







2 


Roger Williams 
Wheaton 




1 
3 


2 



Clark 




1 


3 


North Adams State 




3 





Tufts 







2 


Wellesley 
Bryant College 


R.I.C. Invitational 




1 


2 
3 


Rhode Island College 
UMass-Boston 




2 
2 


1 



Wesleyan 
Wesleyan 
Babson 




1 
1 
3 


2 
2 



Fitchburg State 
Eastern Nazarene 




3 
2 


1 
3 


Worcester State 




3 





Stonehill 


Smith Invitational 





3 


UMaine-Farmington 
Smith 




2 




2 


Conn. College 
S.M.U. 




1 
2 


1 
1 


Smith 







2 


Regis 

Assumption 
Salem State 




2 
2 
3 



1 
1 


Westfield State 




3 





Framingham State 




3 





1988 MASCAC CHAMPIONS 




MASCAC RECORD: 


6-0 




SEASON RECORD: 14-12-1 






170 



VOLLEYBALL 






T 



he Bridgewater State College women's volleyball 
team won the MASCAC title for the first time since 
1983. After a slow start in the season, coach Paula 
Karalekas and her troops demolished their opponents 
by winning 10 of their last 15 matches including a (6- 
0) mark against MASCAC opponents. The team was a 
blend of both vetran and new players. Leading the 
way for the taem was MASCAC all stars Cathie Karl, 
and Nancy Leger. Bridgewater's freshmen corps in- 
cluded Tina Plourde, Candy Antonelli, and Stephanie 
Osgood. The team is building stronger each year and 
looks promising next season. 




1988-89 Women's Volleyball Team. FRONT ROW: Vicki Mazza, Anna 
Marie Cloutier, Nancy Leger, Cathie Karl, Sue Gentile, Maura CoUopy. 
BACK ROW: Amy Stockbridge, Rosemarie Mazzone, Jennifer Mosca, 
Stephanie Ponte, Jane Tolan, Tina Plourde, Stephanie Osgood, Lisa 
Weinberg, Candy Antonelli, Charlene Casey, Katie Tedeschi, Paula 
Karaleskas (head coach). 



171 



WRESTLING 



T 



he Bridgewater State Wrestling team had a tough 
season with only one win for the year. The team had 
excellent showings from Rob O'Donnell who placed 
fifth in the MIT Invitational, and had 14 wins and 7 
losses for the season, and from Gary Kruskall who 
gained All New England honnors at the New En- 
glands this year. Unfortuneately injuries decimated 
the team in mid-season causing the Bears to be short- 
handed for many meets. If the team stays intact for 
next year they should be a much more experienced 
group on the mat. 




1988-89 Wrestling Team. Matt Bohan, Eric Caldwell, Mike Aloupis, 
Mike Lamphere, Herman Marzarotti, Dan Coady, Peter Barron, Mike 
Kenney, Jim Marshall, Derek Wassel, John Rowe, Kip Harms (head 
coach). 



172 




SCOREBOARD 


BSC 


OPP 


U. of Lowell 21 


28 


Western N.E. College 3 


41 


Central Connecticut 15 


40 


Merchant Marine Acad. 3 


47 


UMass/Boston 12 


37 


Plymouth State 6 


41 


WUliams 3 


47 


M.l.T. 3 


47 


Southern Connecticut Tournament 




Coast Guard 24 


21 


USMMA 3 


47 


S. Connecticut 12 


33 


Montclair State 6 


44 


Trinity 12 


38 


WNEC 4 


42 


R.l.C. 


57 


W.P.I. 3 


48 


New Englands 10.25pts 




11th Place 




SEASON RECORD: 1-15 






173 



SCOREBOARD 


BSC 


OPP 


S.M.U. 96 


137 (W) 


17 


191 (M) 


Brandeis 104 


124 (W) 


71 


102 (M) 


Regis 112 


174 (W) 


Westfield 150 


136 (W) 


M.I.T. 59 


81 (W) 


Salem State 96 


44 (W) 


Holy Cross 46 


91 (M) 


UMass/Boston 136 


58 (W) 


57 


113 (M) 


W.P.I. 50 


45 (W) 


7 


84 (M) 


Babson College 146 


77 (W) 


19 


118 (M) 


Plymouth State 172 


126 (W) 


New Englands 185.5 pts (W) 




18th Place 




SEASON RECORD: 6-4 (W), 0-6 (M) 






1.74 



SWIMMING 



T 




he women had an extremely successful season finin- 
shing with their first winning record in over seven 
years. They finished 18th in the New Englands and 
broke six team records in the process. The key to their 
success was in their team depth and the return of 
talented swimmers from the previous year. With no 
seniors on the team they can be stronger next season. 
Unfortuneately, the same can't be said of the men's 
team who struggled because of small numbers. They 
will be in a rebuilding stage for the next few years 
before they reach the level of the women. 






1988-89 Swimming Team. FRONT ROW: Brenda Zellen, Kerry Toler, 
Christir\e Pendleton, Denise Murphy, Stephanie Kozowyk, Nicole Col- 
lette, Tara Dolan. SECOND ROW: Michelle Peterson, Brooke Burgess, 
Michelle McMackin, Karen Saliba, Jennifer Beaudoin, Laureen Lee, 
Elizabeth Sanders, Ken Johnson. BACK ROW: Wendy Schwartz, Erin 
Lane, Julie Knibbs, Heather Lambert, Kathy Sugrue, Heather Weldon, 
Susan Capozza, Laura Payne, Joanne Anderson, Joe Yeskewicz(head 
coach), Bryan King(assistant coach). 



175 



GYMNASTICS 



T 



he lady gymnasts had one of their better seasons even 
though their record may not indicate it. Bridgewater 
lost to two Division 2 teams and two of the better 
Division 3 teams in New England. They came within 
one-tenth of a point of breaking the school record for 
overall points (153). Individually, freshman sensation 
Heather Swedis shattered nearly every record this 
season and can only get better as her carrer at BSC 
continues. With a solid cast of freshmen back for next 
year, more BSC records could be on their way down in 
the near future. 




1988-89 Women's Gymnastics Team. FRONT ROW: Melissa Branco, 
Kim Berardi, Carol Hanagan, Teresa Spencer, Andrea Young, Honey 
Ross. BACK ROW: Sharon Heraty(assistant coach), Gina DiCarlo, Di- 
anne Coady, Jane Ziamski, Brenda Glover, Heather Swedis, Pat Tay- 
lor(trainer), Andrea Kelleher(head caoch). 



176 




SCOREBOARD 






BSC 


OPP 


M.I.T. 




147.15 


153.2 


Bridgeport 




140.20 


174.45 


Salem State 




143.5 


158.15 


Brown University 




144.55 


171.45 


Ursinus College 




152.9 


147.4 


Rhode Island College 




149.05 


129.50 


Westfield State 




151.05 


110.45 


Hunter College 




151.05 


125.75 


New Englands 


Third Place 


147.60 




SEASON RECORC 


>:4-4 





177 



SCOREBOARD 




BSC OPP 


S.M.U 


1 8 


NICHOLS 


7 2 


CURRY 


4 5 


ROGER WILLIAMS 


5 4 


SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY 


8 1 


STONEHILL 


4 5 


RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 


9 


EASTERN NAZARENE 


7 2 


SALVE REGINA 


8 1 


UMASS-BOSTON 


5 4 


SEASON RECORD (6-4) 1 




178 



Men's 



T 



E 



N 



N 



I 



S 




I 



n the past years the Bridgewater State College men's 
tennis team have tried to pull together a winning team. 
This past year they succeeded. Through the all around 
playing of Minh Vu their number one seat player and 
support from Ho Jun Park, Eric Bergenholtz, Mark Fair- 
banks and Jason Vrona the BSC Bears pulled out a 
winning season of 6-4. The team shows promise for 
future seasons and will continue to build. 



rV-TTTTT\: 





1988-89 Men's Tennis Team. FRONT ROW: Scott Kramer, Jeff 
Rothberg, Jason Verona, Eric Bergenholtz, Steven George. BACK ROW: 
Kary Shumway, Ho Jun Park, Minh Vu, Charles Robinson (coach), Tim 
Edwards. 



179 



WOMEN'S 



T 



E 



N 



N 



I 



S 



T 



he 1988 Women's Tennis Team proved to be a forceful 
opponent. This year, they took home 2 out of their 3 
MASCAC games and improved considerably from last 
year's record. Ending the season 8-5 couldn't have 
been accomplished without the team work as a whole 
as Kristy Freedman, Pam wheeler, Christine Gates 
and Kara Canney provided the team with leadership. 




1988-89 Women's Tennis Team. FRONT ROW: Pat Carling, Deb Whip- 
ple, Christine Gates, Kara Canvey, Kim Grande. BACK ROW: Jennifer 
Demegho, Kristy Freedman, Christina Aylward, Pam Wheeler, Minu 
Comeau, Linda Smith. 




m 




ISO 




SCOREBOARD 




BSC OPP 1 


RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 


1 


8 


SIMMONS 


2 


7 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


3 


6 


PINE MANOR 


5 


3 


SALVE REGINA 


3 


6 


SALEM STATE 


7 


1 


S.M.U. 


7 


2 


WESTFIELD STATE 


6 


3 


REGIS 


5 


4 


ROGER WILLIAMS 


9 





CURRY 


8 


1 


ASSUMPTION 


2 


7 


STONEHILL 


5 


4 


SEASON RECORD 


(8-5) 





181 




182 



BASEBALL 



T 



he Bridgewater State Men's Baseball team had an 
incredible season this past year. They shattered last 
year's 18-11 record with a 24-4 winning season. The 
team showed poise and character throughout the en- 
tire year as they continued to pull out wins from close 
and unpredictable games. The double header game 
against Worcester State College gave the Bears a run 
for their money, but they somehow found a way to 
remain on top in both games 7-6 and 7-8. Brian 
Whidden lead the team well fronn the mound as he 
pitched his fastball, curveball or screwball. 



it- *-. iJU. 



y 



1988-89 Baseball Team. FRONT ROW: Mike Lookner, John O'Laery, 
Brian Whidden, Paul Duffy, Dave Enos, Jim Domitrz, Doug Benoit. 
SECOND ROW: Rich Grant, Ken Segal, Tim Plante, Jeff Chretien, Steve 
Happas, Mike Bruemmel, Joe Larson. THIRD ROW: Doug Vadnais, Mike 
Tranfaglia, Ed Grueter, Jim Howard, Todd McAnough, Tom Burke. 
FOURTH ROW: Mike Marini, Mike O'Donnell, Bill Gassett, Jay Doherty, 
Mike Hocking, Darren Brandon, Tom Zaya, Kevin Higgins, Dave 
Sheehan. MISSING: Coaches Glenn Tufts, Bob Fernandes, Ken Harding. 



183 



SCOREBOARD 




BSC OPP 1 


FITCHBURG STATE 


10 


1 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


14 


11 


BABSON 


11 


3 


WILLIAMS 


3 


12 


AIC 


4 





AMHERST 


16 


26 


MERRIMACK 


9 


12 




13 


3 


EASTERN NAZARENE 


21 


8 


EASTERN CONNECTICUT 


9 


3 


ROGER WILLIAMS 


10 


1 


FITCHBURG STATE 


13 


1 




11 


3 


WORCESTER STATE 


7 
7 
6 


6 
8 
4 


STONEHILL 


SALEM STATE 


4 
5 

15 
5 

10 


3 
1 



1 
2 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


MASS. MARITIME 




15 


1 


BABSON 


7 


6 


WESTFIELD STATE 


10 







11 


2 


NICHOLS 


7 


3 




14 


5 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


15 


14 


SEASON RECORD (24-4) 







HU lilil— — >ii ■■ !■■■— — M 



184 





185 



SOFTBALL 



T 



he Lady Bears almost repeated their best season ever 
for the second year in a row. Their (25-6) winning 
season was outstanding as they also were 1898 MAS- 
CAC Champions with an 11-1 MASCAC record. The 
pitching was lead again, as in last season by Judy Reid. 
Reid, however, had great support behind her in the 
field. Strong catching by Cathie Karl, quick ground 
ball play by Kathy McGough as second base, and hard 
hitting was lead by Winnie McGarry. All of the Lady 
Bears will be back next season ready to improve upon 
their outstanding record. 




1988-89 Softball Team. FRONT ROW: Deb Carreiro, Kim Newcomb, 
Janet DiGirolamo, Kathy McGough, Cathie Karl, Judy Reid, Stephanie 
Ponte, Dee Dee Enabenter. SECOND ROW: Sue Pollard, Betty Brown, 
Joan Bruno, Marie Farrar, Laurie Lacerte, Cindy Mello, Beth Donahue. 
BACK ROW: Tim Carey, Winnie McGarry, Elisa Stokowski, Kelly-Anne 
Burns, Deb Whipple, Jennifer Malloy, Kerri Conley, Jennifer Brown. 



186 




SCOREBOARD 




BSC OPP 1 


FLORIDA INSTITUTE OF TECH 


6 


4 




3 


5 


BARRY UNIVERSITY 


6 
1 

15 


9 

2 
13 


TUFTS 


S.M.U. 


1 







2 


5 


RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 


3 


2 




10 


2 


FITCHBURG STATE 


16 


2 




16 


3 


WORCESTER STATE 


9 


1 




2 


8 


EASTERN CONNECTICUT 





5 




2 





SALEM STATE 


5 


3 




9 


4 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


10 







16 





SOUTHERN MAINE 


5 







13 


2 


STONEHILL 


15 







7 


3 


WESTFIELD STATE 


4 


1 




11 


2 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


7 


2 




18 





BENTLEY 


7 







4 


2 


PLYMOUTH STATE 


7 


4 




10 





SEASON RECORD (25-6) 






187 




188 



WOMEN'S 



LACROSSE 



W 



ith new coach Cathy McSweeney the Women's 
Lacrosse team had a rough season this past year. 
Despite their valient efforts against Plymouth 
State College (10-4) and Babson (16-6) they 
ended the season with a record of 5-6. However, 
strong play was shown from Andrea Erickson 
with her 34 goals for the season and Danielle 
Webber's 14 season goals. The team is looking 
forward to a stronger season next year with the 
help of players Cynthia Costa and Kim Conrad. 




1988-89 Women's Lacrosse. FRONT ROW: Maureen Saliba, Ronda 
Davis, Nicole Rojanski, Megan O'Connell, Andrea Erickson, Kristin 
Damore, Danielle Webber, Marilyn Gomes, Nancy Delaney, Deborah 
Russo. BACK ROW: Kathy McSweeny (coach), Kathy Stockman, Nicole 
Brunell, Cynthia Costa, Martha Wall, Cindy McDonnell, Roberta Tag- 
lieri, Joanne Smith, Margaret Doherty, Kimberly Conrad, Maura Pow- 
ers, Chris Joyce. 



189 




190 




SCOREBOARD 




BSC OPP 1 


MT. HOLYOKE 


3 


16 


WELLESLEY 


4 


10 


SPRINGHELD 


6 


8 


WHEATON 


4 


10 


TUFTS 


1 


18 


PLYMOUTH STATE 


10 


4 


PINE MANOR 


9 


5 


NEW ENGLAND COLLEGE 


16 


6 


SMITH 


10 


6 


BABSON 


16 


6 


HOLY CROSS 


11 


10 


SEASON RECORE 


) (5-6) 






191 





e begin our final farewell with an introduction to the graduating Class of 
1989. In the past four (or five?) years, we have seen many new and different 
changes, but the things that have made the most definite impression on us 
are the friends we've made and the times and memories we've shared. As we 
take our final steps, we'd like to wish good luck and a successful future to all. 
Best Wishes from BSC . . . 



192 



SENIORS 




Nanci Burgio 

Senior Section Editor 



« 





NEW 

and 

DIFFERENT 






193 



Bonnie S. Abrams 

Social Work 

Stephen P. Abreu 

Elementary Education 

Michael Abusheery 

Computer Science 



Denise D. Adamian 

Physical Education 

Linda Aguiar 

Elementary Education 

Kevin J, Alcaro 

Management Science 



George Anderson 

Sociology 

Kimberly Antonio 

Early Childhood Education 

Lisa Apovian 

Psychology 



Tracey Armstrong 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Joseph Arsenault 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Christine Aulenback 

Spanish 




194 




Lisa Austin 

Sociology 

Darryl Aviza 

English 

George Baldino 

Management Science 



Cheryle Barboza 

Social Work 

Sandra Barboza 

Special Education 

Lori Barrett 

Physical Education 




1989 



SENIORS 



WHO'S DRIVING THE LIMO this time? Mark Reardon, Reenie Broderick, 
Carol Cayer, and Chris Meade prep for a night on the town. 



195 



Susan Barrows 

Communication Arts And Sciences 

Christine Barry 

Management Science 

Judy Barry 

Management Science 



Peter Barry 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Euanna Basler 

Sociology 

Annette M. Belanger 

Psychology 




1989 



SENIORS 




OOHS AND AAHS FOR BRIDGEWATER'S ROYALTY as Denise Adami- 
an, Jim Thomson, Jim Massari, Rachael Shannon, and Timothy Gaines ride 
in the Homeconning Parade. 



196 




Deanna Belcher 

Psychology 

Linda Bellas 

Art 

Angela Beninati 

Early Childhood Education 



Donna J. Bennett 

Management Science 

Kimberly Bentley 

Management Science 

Christine Berardi 

Management Science 



Jeanne D. Bernier 

Elementary Education 

Peter Berthiaume 

Sociology 

Mark Bettencourt 

Psychology 



Jeffrey Beysolow 

Management Science 

Andrea Bickum 

Anthropology 

Carol Bilodeau 

Social Work 



197 



Kathleen Black 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Paul Blay 

Physical Education 

Jennifer Boner 

Psychology 



Kimberly Booth 

Elementary Education 

Stephanie H. Borden 

Elementary Education 

Lisa Bowman 

Aviation Science 



Peter Boutin 

Communcation Arts and Sciences 

Corinne Brandon 

Management Science 

Roger Brisson 

Management Science 



Cathy J. Britland 

Elementary Education 

Noreen Broderick 

Psychology 

Cheryl A. Brown 

Elementary Education 




198 




Jeffrey Brown 

Physical Education 

Debra Brownell 

Sociology 

Lisa Bruneau 

Management Science 



Nanci A. Burgio 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Joseph E. Burke 

Art 

John R. Burns III 

Communication Arts and Sciences 



Katherine Bryant 

Elementary Education 

Jim Cadorette 

Management Science 

Clare Cahill 

Elementary Education 



Lizabeth Callahan 

Elementary Education 

Susann M. Campagna 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Lori Beth Campo 

Communication Arts and Sciences 



199 



Kara Canney 

Management Science 

Craig Carey 

Physical Education 

Timothy Carey 

Physical Education 



Carol Cayer 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Judith Challies 

Elementary Education 

Elizabeth Charron 

Management Science 



Anne Marie Chicoine 

Physical Education 

Bridget Chin 

Biology 

Maureen Church 

Management Science 



Andrea Cieri 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Kathy Clinton 

Management Science 

Matthew Collins 

Management Science 




200 




Donna Condon 

Elementary Education 

Richard Conklin 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

John Coleman 

History 



Margaret Conlan 

Management Science 

Donna Conley 

Management Science 

Nikki M. Constantine 

Biology 




1989 



SENIORS 



AT THE FIRST SUITCASE DANCE in 1988, Jimbo, Jethro, Carlos, Dan, 
and Jeff don't care if they win a trip or not! 



201 



Karen Coons 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Jill Coots 

Art 

Patricia Cordeiro 

Physical Education 



Lorraine M. Cotti 

Elementary Education 

Christopher Cox 

Aviation Science 

Sarah Coyle 

Elementary Education 




1989 



SENIORS 




ENJOYING OF THE HIGHLIGHT of Senior Year at the Homecoming 
Tailgating Parties are this group of Seniors 1989. 



202 




Ellen S. Crasnick 

Special Education 

Ronald Crivell 

Management Science 

Susan Crivell 

Management Science 



Shawn Croke 

Sociology 

Kim Crompton 

Early Childhood Education 

Cheryl Cronin 

Social Work 



Kimberly Crosby 

Elementary Education 

Lisa Cruz 

Special Education 

Jannette L. Cummings 

Elementary Education 



Ann Curley 

History 

James Curtin 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Marie D'Entremont 

English 



203 



Christopher M. Daly 

Management Science 

Kathrina Y. Danico 

Psychology 

Barbara Daniels 

Elementary Education 



Maria DaSilva 

Elementary Education 

Leonard Davies 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Fredia Davis 

Psychology 



Eddie DeAndrade 

Management Science 

Nandine DeDoming e 

Management Science " 

Laurel Degutis 

Psychology 



Beth Delalla 

Elementary Education 

Cheryl DellicoUi 

Early Childhood Education- 

Joan DeLuca 

Elementary Education 




204 




Joanne DeSisto 

Elementary Education 

Jeannine Desrosiers 

Physical Education 

Anthony DeStefano 

Political Science 



Philip Dias 

Aviation Science 

Paula DiBenedetto 

Early Childhood Education 

Christine DiCesare 

Communication Arts and Sciences 



Barbara Dillon 

Social Work 

Christine DiMaria 

Elementary Education 

Rachel Disanto 

Psychology 



Denise Discepolo 

Elementary Education 

Betsy Dolan 

English 

Mike Donahue 

Management Science 



205 



William Donnellan 

Elementary Education 

Kathi Donnelly 

Psychology 

Lorraine Donovan 

Psychology 



Paul Donovan 

Management Science 

Michael Dooley 

Geography 

Denise DriscoU 

Early Childhood Education 



Patricia Droege 

Chemistry 

Laura M. Drouin 

Elementary Education 

Timothy Duffy 

Communication Arts and Sciences 



Sarah J. Duggan 

Physical Education 

Paul Dunlevy 

Elementary Education 

James Dupuis 

Aviation Science 




206 




Juliann Dwyer 

Management Science 

Wendy Egan 

Management Science 

David Ellis 

Aviation Science 



Judy Emde 

Management Science 

Catherine A. Ennis 

Elementary Education 

Karen Enos 

Management Science 



»*u 




19 89 



SENIORS 



THE BOSTON BUDDIES HANG OUT at the 1988 Homecoming Tailgating 
Parties: Frankie, Laurie, Lorraine, Amy, Michael and Duff. 



207 



Sonja Evancho 

Mathematics 

Kimberley Ewers 

Elementary Education 

Diane Falavoro 

Early Childhood Education 



Leonard Fama 

Physics 

Diane Farrell 

Management Science 

Elizabeth Farricy 

Elementary Education 




HIS 



SENIORS 




BEACH PARTY BRINGS OUT THE BEST of Seniors 1989! 



208 




Cheryl Fata 

Elementary Education 

Michelle Faulkner 

Elementary Education 

Michelle Feid 

Management Science 



Gerald Fenton 

Political Science 

Carmela Ferioli 

Mathematics 

Kimberly Anne Ferraro 

Early Childhood Education 



Tracy J. FerruUo 

Management Science 

Polly Field 

Physical Education 

Joan M. Finnigan 

Management Science 



Mary Fitzgerald 

Social Work 

Karen Fitzpatrick 

Management Science 

Mary FitzSimmons 

Psychology 



209 



Marya Fleming 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Karen Florentine 

Elementary Education 

Christopher Foglietta 

Physical Education 



Deborah Folkes 

Management Science 

Michelle Fontaine 

Biology 

Joanne Fournier 

English 



Margaret Frates 

Psychology 

Stephen Frati 

Aviation Science 

John French 

Psychology 



Karen Friesen 

Management Science 

Lisa Gallagher 

Elementary Education 

Michael J. Gallagher 

Management Science 




210 




Jane Gallant 

Elementary Education 

Todd Garrison 

Management Science 

Richard P. Gately 

Management Science 



Susanne Gauthier 

Elementary Education 

Donna Gavin 

Elementary Education 

David Gazaille 

Physical Eduction 



John Gedgaudas 

Management Science 

Susan E. Gentile 

Physical Education 

Shawn George 

Political Science 



Patricia Gillis 

Management Science 

Kathleen Glynn 

Management Science 

Sandra Glynn 

Art 



211 



Lisa Goddard 

Special Education 

Manuel Goncalves 

Management Science 

Alan Good 

Psychology 



Scott Goodrich 

Biology 

Susan Gould 

Social Work 

Bethany Goulet 

Biology 



Jeffrey Greelish 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Craig S. Hall 

Political Science 

Carol Hanagan 

Early Childhood Education 



Katheryn E. Hannaford 

Psychology 

Charlotte Hanrahan 

Social Work 

Dianne Harding 

Early Childhood Education 




212 




Christine Harrington 

Special Education 

Sarah Harrison-Cook 

Elementary Education 

Kathleen Hartley 

Management Science 



Sharon Heraty 

Management Science 

William Heydt 

Physical Education 

Marylou Higgins 

History 




1989 



SENIORS 



EXCITED SENIORS 1989 START OFF the year at Convocation, the tra- 
ditional opening of the academic year. 



213 



Nanci Hilditch 

History 

Susan Humphreys 

Elementary Education 

Diane Hurley 

Communication Arts and Sciences 



Susan Hurwitz 

Psychology 

Brenda Hyland 

Elementary Education 

Cara lannacchero 

Psychology 




19tS 



SENIORS 




MORE OF BRIDGEWATER'S ROYALTY take a ride in the Homecoming 
Parade: Gerry LaBelle, Karen Coons, Erin Onos. 



214 




Christine Ingemi 

Management Science 

Julie Jackman 

Mathematics 

Joanne M. Jackson 

Elementary Education 



Susan Jakub 

Elementary Education 

Lynn A. Jenkins 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Brian Jenney 

Psychology 



Karen Kardoose 

Management Science 

Andrew Karparis 

Physical Education 

Bob Katilus 

Communication Arts and Sciences 



Gary M. Kaufman 

Management Science 

Stephen Kelly 

History 

Shannon E. Kenny 

Anthropology 



215 



Louise Anne Kent 

Early Childhood Education 

Craig Kiernan 

English 

Noreen Kiff 

Elementary Education 



Ann L. Killory 

Early Childhood Education 

Kerri Kincaid 

Early Childhood Education 

Robert E. King 

Political Science 



Donna Kirby 

Elementary Education 

Susan Kirker 

Management Science 

Lance Kolb 

Management Science 



Charles S. Konstantinidis 

Political Science 

Edward Krovitz 

Management Science 

Gerald LaBelle 

Psychology 




216 




Terri LaFreniere 

Elementary Education 

Ethel Lagadinos 

Management Science 

Curtis Landsberger 

Aviation Science 



Jean Lattanzi 

Physical Education 

Lisa Laurino 

Management Science 

Jennine LaVigne 

Elementary Education 



Melissa Lawrence 

Elementary Education 

John Leahy 

Political Science 

Susan Leal 

Management Science 



Ted LeBlanc 

Management Science 

Sean Leger 

Management Science 

Geoffrey Lelliott 

Aviation Science 



217 



Robert D. LeMay 

Social Work 

Nilde Leo 

Psychology 

Cynthia Leonard 

Management Science 



Christine Lewinsky 

Management Science 

Jeannine Lifrieri 

Psychology 

Karen Liolios 

Psychology 



Allan Litchfield 

Computer Science 

Dori Lonergan 

Early Childhood Education 

James Loonie 

Management Science 



Catherine Loranger 

Elementary Education 

Peter Louzan 

Psychology 

Lynn Lunisden 

Management Science 




218 




Alan M. Lydiard 

Elementary Education 

Margaret Lydon 

English 

Scott MacDonald 

Management Science 



Helen MacGavin 

Social Work 

Lisa Machado 

Psychology 

Heather McCleery 

Management Science 




1989 



SENIORS 



SOME OF PROGRAM COMMITTEE SENIORS wave to enthusiastic 
crowd in the 1988 Homecoming Parade. 



219 



Jane MacLeod 

Elementary Education 

Allison MacPhadden 

Management Science 

Daniel MacPherson 

Management Science 



Andrew Madden 

Management Science 

Michelle Magner 

Elementary Education 

William Mahaney 

Management Science 




1989 



SENIORS 




DAVE PENZA FINDS HIS "JOB" at the Print Shop quite amusing. By the 
way, how's the white paper you never have when we need it? 



220 




Lynn Malkasian 

Sociology 

Claire Malliaroudakis 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Donald Mandeville 

Management Science 



Mary Anne Manley 

Psychology 

Evelyn Marques 

Socio/ Work 

Peter Marsiglia 

Management Science 



Richard Martignetti 

Management Science 

Mary Martin 

Social Work 

Thomas Martin 

Avaition Science 



Priscilla Martin 

Early Childhood Education 

Stephanie Mason 

Management Science 

James M. Massari 

Management Science 



221 



Jeffrey S. Mate 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Nonnie Maziya 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

David McCallum 

Computer Science 



Heather McClellan 

Elementary Education 

Mary E. McClentic 

Art 

Eric McCormack 

Computer Science 



Michelle McCormack 

Elementary Education 

Susan McCurry 

Special Education 

Amy McElheney 

Elementary Education 



Donna McElroy 

Management Science 

Andrea McFarlane 

Psychology 

Shaun McGaughey 

Management Science 




111 




Amy McLaughlin 

Elementary Education 

John L. McLean 

Psychology 

Paula McManus 

Special Education 



Dianne P. McNeil 

Management Science 

Paula McNeil 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Larry McQuade 

Management Science 



Cynthia Merigo 

Art 

Mandy Miserandino 

Early Childhood Education 

Diana K. Mitchell 

Early Childhood Education 



Annette Marie Moccia 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Mike Molitoris 

Management Science 

Diane Monahan 

Management Science 



223 



Kerran Moniz 

Elementary Education 

Calma Monruskin 

Elementary Education 

Shelly A. Montone 

Physical Education 



Carla Moore 

Management Science 

Janet Moore 

Computer Science 

Richard Moore 

Political Science 



Debra Morse 

Art 

Mary Mortensen 

History 

Susan Moxley 

Biology 



Joseph Mucci 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Wendy Mucci 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Robert Mulcahy 

Communication Arts and Sciences 




224 




Shelley Nedzweckas 

Political Science 

Laurie Needs 

Psychology 



Anne F. Mullen 

Special Education 

Michelle Murphy 

Management Science 

Elaine Naegelin 

Elementary Education 




989 



SENIORS 



MAKING THE FINISHING TOUCHES on his fraternity's. Alpha Eta Rho, 
float is Senior Chris Bogdan. 



225 



Leah Negrucci 

Management Science 

Edward T. Nicolleti Jr. 

Management Science 

Daniel O'Brien 

Management Science 



Karen O'Brien 

Political Science 

Danielle Ogren 

Management Science 

Thomas O'Hara 

Management Science 




1989 



SENIORS 




THE UNKNOWN COMIC SLIPPED INTO the Homecoming TaUgaiting 
Parties to share a few jokes. 



226 




Carlos Oliveira 

Physical Education 

Karyn O'Neil 

Psychology 

Erin Onos 

Communication Arts and Sciences 



Rose Orlando 

Elementary Education 

Maryellen O'Rourke 

Psychology 

Ann Ottaviani 

Management Science 



Kathy Pagliuca 

Psychology 

Julia T. Pappalardo 

Biology 

Mark Paquin 

Management Science 



Barbara M. S. Parsley 

Psychology 

Jeffrey Parsons 

Management Science 

Christopher Patota 

Physical Education 



227 



Mark V. Patterson 

Political Science 

Stacey Pendleton 

Early Childood Education 

David Penza 

Management Science 



Kathy Pereira 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Lynn Perron 

Elementary Education 

Denise Perry 

Early Childhood Education 



Juliana Perry 

Management Science 

Beverly Peterson 

Management Science 

Carolyn V. Petrell 

Physical Education 



Ronald B. Pettit Jr. 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

John Phelps 

Management Science 

Timothy Philpott 

Management Science 




228 




Stephen Pieroni 

Psychology 

John Poirier 

Chemistry 

Arlene Polvinen 

English 



Marianne Pongratz 

Biology 

Todd Poudrier 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Nancy Powers 

Early Childhood Education 



Timothy Powers 

Physical Education 

Barbara Prinviotta 

Management Science 

Marianne Proffetty 

Management Science 



Nicholas Promponas 

Psychology 

Joseph Quinn 

Management Science 

Manuela R. Rando 

Management Science 



229 



Susan Raymond 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Thomas Rayner 

Chemistry 

Stephen Reardon 

History 



Laura Ritucci 

Elementary Education 

Patricia Rocharz 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Cheryl Rogers 

Aviation Science 



Lisa Ronan 

Social Work 

Gary Rose 

Management Science 

Kevin Rousseau 

Management Science 



Anne Roy 

Special Education 

Beth Rubin 

Management Science 

Beth Ruppenthal 

Mathematics 




230 




Renee Saba 

Early Childhood Education 

Gaye Saccocia 

Early Childhood Education 

Alisa Safley 

Early Childhood Education 



Hisham Saikali 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

John Sannella 

Physical Education 

Tracy Santos 

Elementary Education 




1989 



E N I R S 



YES, COACH! IT LOOKS LIKE Mike Wallace has few things to tell you 
about how to play the Game. 



231 



Lori Sarruda 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Robert Savery 

Management Science 

Kevin Sawyer 

Mathematics 



Jodi Scarborough 

Physical Education 

Kelley Scherber 

Physical Education 

Susan Schindler 

Physical Education 




i 



1H9 

SENIORS 




SHOWING OFF THEIR OLYMPIC GOLD, gal pal Joanne Staff and frateni- 
ty brother Allan Lucas pose for the photographer as Tom Vickery looks on. 



232 




Jennifer Scott 

Biology 

Matthew Scott 

Computer Science 

Jeffrey Seeley 

Physical Education 



Matthew Sekelsky 

Aviation Science 

Rachael Shannon 

Psychology 

Mary K. Sheehan 

Physical Education 



Karen Shine 

Management Science 

Deborah Shetland 

Psychology 

Jodi Shulman 

Early Childhood Education 



Laura Silverstein 

Psychology 

Marci Skiddell 

Early Childhood Education 

Carolyn Skilton 

Psychology 



233 



Christopher Smalley 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

David Smith 

Management Science 

Janine Smith 

Early Childhood Education 



Martha Smith 

Physical Education 

Stacey D. Smith 

Social Work 

William C. Smith 

Communication Arts and Sciences 



Edwin Sopp 

Biology 

Anne Souza 

Elementary Education 

Shawn P. Spencer 

Communication Arts and Sciences 



Linda Spillane 

Elementary Education 

Jennifer Spruce 

Elementary Education 

John Stachowiak 

Management Science 




234 




Ellen J. Stanford 

Biology 

Marcia Stetson 

Management Science 

Peter Stokinger 

Management Science 



Gregory Strachoff 

Sociology 

Heidi Strugis 

Art 

Cathy Sullivan 

Management Science 



Christine Sullivan 

Mathematics 

Maureen Sullivan 

Sociology 

Kerri Ann Swain 

Physical Education 



Kimberly Swarbrick 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Barbara J. Swartz 

Sociology 

Kimberley Sweeney 

Elementary Education 



235 



Jill Sylvester 

Management Science 

Michele Szymanczyk 

Psychology 

Cathy Tack 

Sociology 



Patricia Taylor %^ 

Physical Education 

David Tchorz 

Management Science 

Janice Teller 

Elementary Education 



Lynne Thomas 

Elementary Education 

James Thompson 

Physical Education 

Lisa Thompson 

Physical Education 



Nancy Tiberi 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Laura Tobey 

Early Childhood Education 

Terry Tobin 

Management Science 




236 




Tracy A. Tortorella 

Psychology 

Michael Travers 

Management Science 

Jamie Traynor 

Communication Arts and Sciences 



Joanne Trodella 

Psychology 

Robin Urbati 

Psychology 

Jeffrey Valin 

Communication Arts and Sciences 




1989 



SENIORS 



DURING THE 'BEST NIGHT OF THE YEAR', the Spring Ball, Ed Swirba- 
lus and Joanne DeSisto have a good time. 



237 



Christine Vedovelli 

History 

Thomas A. Vickery 

Aviation Science 

Laurine Vieira 

Management Science 



Michelle Volpe 

Management Science 

Sharon Viveiros 

English 

Richard J. Waldron 

Management Science 




191! 



SENIORS 




AND BEST OF LUCK TO THE NEW SENIORS 1990 ... as these Juniors 
begin prepping themselves for next year's Homecoming extravangaza. 



238 









Michael Wallace 

Political Science 

David Walsh 

Management Science 

Kathleen Walsh 

History 




Lauren Walsh 

Management Science 

Edmund F. Ward 

History 

Sally Anne Ward 

Communication Arts and Sciences 




Brian A. Warren 

Computer Science 

John R. Washington 

Management Science 

Cathy Watson 

Management Science 




Lillian Jane Waugh 

Psychology 

Bethanne Welch 

Early Childhood Education 

Linda Welch 

Elementary Education 



239 



Susan Westwood 

Communication Arts and Sciences 

Michael Whelan 

Management Science 

Sandra White 

Physical Educaton 



Christine Whitehead 

Early Childhood Education 

Brendan Wilcox 

Management Science 

Carolyn Wood 

Management Science 



Michelle Woolf 

Psychology 

Michelle Wunschel 

English 

Debra Yeshulas 

Elementary Education 



Jennifer Young 

Elementary Education 

Lynne Zakur 

Early Childhood Education 

Charles Zizzo 

Communication Arts and Sciences 




240 







The 



Bridgewater State College 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Congratulates 

The Class of 1989 



Best Wishes and Good Luck to the Class of 1989 as they join 
the 28,000 Alumni throughout the U.S. and the World. 



ON COMMENCEMENT DAY, YOUR CLASS WAS INDUCTED TO THE 
BRIDGEWATER STATE COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION WHICH 
IS 28,000 MEMBERS STRONG. BEING AN ALUMNI HAS ITS 
ADVANTAGES BUT IT HAS ALSO SOME RESPONSIBILITIES. 
THE INFORMATION OUTLINED BELOW MAY ANSWER SOME OF 
YOUR QUESTIONS ABOUT BEING AN "ALUM". 




YOUNG ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

For the first ten years, you are con- 
sidered an "young alumni" and there 
are special activities catering specif- 
ically to young alums. These activ- 
ities are planned and implemented 




by the Young Alumni Committee. 

PHILANTHROPIC ACTIVITIES 

Every year, the Alumni Association 
holds its Annual Fund Campaign de- 
signed to raise money for the many 
programs it supports. Many of the 
facilities and programs that you used 
as an underclassmen would not have 
existed without the support from the 



Annual Fund. Consider making a 
donaton each year, even it is mimimal. 
It's not the amount of money that you 
give that's important, it's the level of 
participation. 

NETWORKING POSSIBILITIES 

In 1989, the Office of Alumni Relations 
and the Office of Career Planning and 
Placement developed and implemented 
a new program called Career Advising 
Network. It is a resource consisting of 
Bridgewater alumni who have agreed to 
speak with current students and fellow 
alumni. Benefits are valuable and we 
urge you to use this service or get in- 
volved as a Career Advisor. For more 
information, contact the Career Plan- 
ning and Placement (508) 697-1328. 

GET INVOLVED 

If you have some free time, just a few 
hours a week, why not consider vol- 
unteering for the Alumni Office? Plan- 
ning and implementing the several hun- 
dred different events and programs for 
28,000 alumni every year a lot of time 
and effort. We would greatly appreciate 
any help that you could provide. 

DON'T BECOME A LOST ALUM 

Many alums are left out of many ac- 
tivities and do not receive college pub- 



lications because we do not have an 
updated address. If you would like to 
have the latest info about the campus 
and your former classmates, please be 
sure that your address is updated — 
especially now. Right after graduation, 
we lose many of our alums and for a 
long time, it is impossible for us get 
alumni information passed on to you. 
So it's vital that we have an updated 
address from you. 

FOR FURTHER QUESTIONS, 
PLEASE CONTACT 

The Office of Alumni Relations 

Adrian Rondileau Campus Center 

Bridgewater State College 

Bridgewater, MA 02325 

508-697-1287 



19 8 9 

SENIORS 



241 





raduation is an intensely emotional time as members of the Class of 1989 take 
time to congratulate each other and, at the same time, say good-bye to each 
other. The following section was created to help you find those special friends 
that you made during your four or five years at Bridgewater State College. 



242 



DIRECTORY 




INEW 

and 

DIFFERENT 



Paul Cournoyer^ Ron Pettit 

Directory Editors 









243 



Senior Directory 




Abrams, Bonnie 

32 Pond Lane 
Randolph MA 02368 

Abreu, Stephen 

53 Hillsdale Street 
Dorchester MA 02124 

Abusheery, Michael 

885 Center Street 
Pembroke MA 

Aguiar, Linda 

74 Longview Road 
New Bedford, MA 02745 

Alcaro, Kevin J. 

22 Charlotte Drive 
Plymouth MA 02360 

Antonio, Kimberly 

39 High Street 
Sharon MA 02067 

Apovian, Lisa 

86 Kenwood Road 
Methuen MA 01844 

Armstrong, Tracey 

15 Longview Drive 
Beverly, MA 01915 

Aulenback, Christine 

5 Oakridge Drive 
Rutland, MA 01543 

Austin, Lisa 

20 Revere Street 
Lexington, MA 02173 

Baldino, George 

90 Upland Road 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Barboza, Cheryle 

37 Monroe Drive 

New Bedford, MA 02746 

Barboza, Sandra 

6 Croft Place 

North Dartmouth, MA 02747 

Barrett, Lori 

7 Maragaret Road 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Barrows, Susan 

642 Plain Street 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Barry, Christine 

39 Church Street 
Canton, MA 02021 

Barry, Judy 



6 Emmett Terrace 
Revere, MA 02151 

Belcher, Deanna 

52 Tobin Terrace 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Bellas, Linda 

73 Broad Reach M54-C 
Weymouthport, MA 02191 

Beninati, Angela 

1692 South Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Bennett, Donna J. 

16 Waverly Street 
Brighton, MA 02135 

Berardi, Christine 

38 Mechanic Street 
Canton, MA 02021 

Berthiaume, Peter 

31 East Clinton Street 
New Bedford, MA 02740 

Bettencourt, Mark 

16 Talbot Street 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Beysolow, Jeffery 

107 Munroe Street 
Roxbury, MA 02119 

Bilodeau, Carol 

33 Jeannie Avenue 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Blay, Paul 

75 Etna Road 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Boner, Jennifer 

698 Salem Street 
Groveland, MA 01834 

Booth, Kimberly 

261 Elm Street 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Borden, Stephanie H. 

116 Bay State Road 
Rehoboth, MA 02769 

Boutin, Peter 

P.O. Box 682 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Bowman, Lisa 

7 Bouman Lane 
Westboro, MA 01581 

Brandon, Corinne 

428 Park Street, Apt 3 



244 



Senior Directory 



Dorchester, MA 02124 

Brisson, Roger 

1170 Wilson Road, Apt 53 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Britland, Cathy J. 

593 Plymouth Avenue 
Fall River, MA 02721 

Broderick, Noreen 

24 Myrick Street 
Allston, MA 02134 

Brown, Cheryl A. 

3 Webb Street 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Brown, Jeffrey 

38 Larch Avenue 
Fairhaven, MA 02719 

Brownell, Debra 

92 Msgr Lydon Way 
Dorchester, MA 02124 

Bruneau, Lisa 

6 Palmer Avenue 

East Freetown, MA 02717 

Bryant, Katherine 

55 Columbus Avenue 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Burgio, Nanci 

514 East Third Street 
South Boston, MA 02127 

Burns, John R. Ill 

211 Russell Street 
Abington, MA 02351 

Cadorette, James 

123 Plymouth Street 
Carver, MA 02330 

Cahill, Clare 

78 Pincushion Road 
Framingham, MA 01701 

Callahan, Lizabeth 

403 Valentine Street 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Campagna, Susann M. 

34 Oakhurst Road 
Scituate, MA 02066 

Campo, Lori Beth 

34 Windsor Avenue 
Johnston, RI 02919 

Canney, Kara 

140 High Street 
Southbridge, MA 01550 



Carey, Craig 

12 Heather Lane 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Carey, Timothy 

8 Alfreton Road 
Needham, MA 02194 

Cayer, Carol 

14 Garland Avenue 

East Longmeadow, MA 01028 

Challies, Judith 

79 Lake Shore Drive 
Brewster, MA 02631 

Charron, Elizabeth 

234 Vernon Street 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Chicoine, Ann Marie 

19 Mullen Way 
Falmouth, MA 02540 

Chin, Bridget 

267 Pleasant Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Church, Maureen 

687 Hyde Park Avenue 
Roslindale, MA 02131 

Coleman, John 

1 1 Meadow Lane, Apt 1 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Collins, Matthew 

Davis Street 
Lee, MA 01238 

Condon, Donna 

98 Auburn Street 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Conklin, Richard 

260 Coolidge Road 
Rochester, MA 14622 

Conley, Donna 

76 Jean Drive 

North Attleboro, MA 02760 

Coons, Karen 

36 Boulevard 
Middletown, RI 02840 

Coots, Jill 

195 Lincoln Street 
West Bridgewater, MA 

Cordeiro, Patricia 

28 Pleasant Street 
Rehoboth, MA 02769 

Cotti, Lorraine M. 




245 



Senior Directory 





Li^^S^^ 




45 Braunecker Road 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Cox, Christopher 

Coyle, Sarah 

327 Country Way 
Scituate, MA 02066 

Crivell, Ronald 

18 Harrison Road 
Canton, MA 02021 

Crivell, Susan 

18 Harrison Raod 
Canton, MA 02021 

Croke, Sharon 

58 Everett Circle 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Crompton, Kim 

854 Tradewind Street 
New Bedford, MA 02740 

Cronin, Cheryl 

14 Annella Road 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Cruz, Lisa 

685 Oak Street BLD 9 Apt 7 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Curley, Ann 

12 Chestnut Street 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

D'Entremont, Marie 

8 Roberts Road 
Canton, MA 02021 

Daly, Christopher M. 

8 Shady Lane 
Franklin, MA 02038 

Daniels, Barbara 

31 Kenney Road 
Medfield, MA 02052 

DaSilva, Maria 

106 Jette Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Davies, Leonard 

63 Lovers Leap 
Lynn, MA 01905 

Davis, Fredia 

116 Presidential Drive 
Bradford, MA 01835 

DeAndrade, Eddie 

a08 Main Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Degutis, Laurel 



9 Jacobs Ladder Road 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Delalla, Beth 

500 High Street 
Abington, MA 02351 

DellicoUi, Cheryl 

7 Tade Street 
Methuen, MA 01844 

DeLuca, Joan 

345 Commercial Street 
Weymouth MA, 02188 

DeSisto, Joanne 

63 Alden Street 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Desrosiers, Jeannine 

26 Main Street 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Dias, Philip 

20 Highland Street 

South Dartmouth, MA 02748 

DiBeneddetto, Paula 

96 Watson Street 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Dillon, Barbara 

21 Cliff Drive 
Taunton, MA 02780 

DiSanto, Rachel 

Pleasant Street 
Canton, MA 02021 

Donahue, Mike 

595 Plymouth Street 
Holbrook, MA 02343 

Donnellan, William 

629 Union Street 

South Weymouth, MA 02190 

Donnelly, Kathi 

37 Olde Farm Road 
South Easton, MA 02375 

Donovan, Lorraine 

14 Guernsey Avenue 
Roslindale, MA 02131 

Donovan, Paul 

39 Battles Farm Drive 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Dooley, Michael 

99 Esta Road 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Driscoll, Denise 

110 Fuller Road 



246 



Senior Directory 



wjj.iiMBw.wii.ai!iHy 



North Weymouth, MA 02191 

Droege, Patricia 

48 Wheeler Circle, Apt. 50 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Duffy, Timothy 

75 Evans Street 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Duggan, Sarah J. 

20 Carver Street 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Dunlevy, Paul 

51 Maolis Avenue 

West Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Dupuis, James 

15 Wendover Way 
Bedford, MA 03102 

Dwyer, Julian 

28 Kidder Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Egan, Wendy 

263 Main Street 
Hanson, MA 02341 

Ellis, David 

89 School Street 
Walpole, MA 02081 

Emde, Judy 

27 Charles Street 

East Waymouth, MA 02189 

Ennis, Catherine A. 

26 Roberts Road 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Enos, Karen 

36 Howard Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

Evancho, Sonja 

84 Standish Avenue 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Ewers, Kimberley 

220 Mill Street 
Holliston, MA 01746 

Falavoro, Diane 

14 Plantation Road 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Fama, Leonard 

Box 50 

Hanover, MA 02339 

Farrell, Diane 

21 Ansie Road 
Chelmsford, MA 01824 



Farricy, Elizabeth A. 

61 Alicia Road 
Dorchester, MA 02124 

Faulkner, Michelle 

164 Rhode Island Road 
Lakeville, MA 02347 

Feid, Michelle 

25 Spruce Street 

North Attleboro, MA 02760 

Ferioli, Carmela 

24 Colonial Post Drive 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

Ferraro, Kimberly 

329 Main Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

Field, Polly 

100 Neck Road 
Mattapoisett, MA 02739 

Finnigan, Joanne 

6 Playstead Road 
Dorchester, MA 02125 

Fitzgerald, Mary 

16 Maple Street 

North Darthmouth, MA 02747 

Fitzpatrick, Karen 

29 Monroe Street 
Taunton, MA 02780 

FitzSimmons, Mary 

638 Montello Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Fleming, Marya 

3 Brierpatch Lane 
Mattapoisett, MA 02739 

Florentino, Karen 

5 Parker Drive 
Wareham, MA 02571 

Foglietta, Christopher 

56 Orchard Street 
Lynn, MA 01905 

Folkes, Deborah 

38 Turner Road 
Holliston, MA 01746 

Fontaine, Michelle 

18 Bradstreet Avenue 
Roslindale, MA 02131 

Fournier, Joanne 

558 Twin Lakes Drive 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Frates, Margaret 




247 



Senior Directory 




63 Amherst Road 
Beverly, MA 01915 

Frati, Stephen 

57 Cottage Park Road 
Winthrop, MA 02152 

French, John 

13 Sky field Drive 
Groton, MA 01450 

Friesen, Karen 

121 Washington Street 
North Easton, MA 02356 

Gallagher, Lisa 

736 Plymouth Street 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Garrison, Todd 

26 Green Street 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Gately, Richard P. 

55 Townsend Ave. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Gauthier, Susanne 

46 Eamund Street 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Gavin, Donna 

338 Locust Street 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Gazaille, David 

266 Katama Road 
Edgartown, MA 02539 

Gedgaudas, John 

103 Atkinson Drive 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

George, Shawn 

2 Fairfield Road 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Gillis, Patricia 

35 McGarvey Road 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Glynn, Sandra 

20 Clifton Ave. 
Scituate, MA 02066 

Goddard, Lisa 

545 Tremont Street 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Goncalves, Manuel 

9 Hamlet Street 
Boston, MA 02125 

Good, Alan 

1 1 Hemlock Drive 



Canton, MA 02021 

Goodrich, Scott 

22 Lexington Street 
Canton, MA 02021 

Gould, Susan 

105 Lorri Lane 

East Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Hall, Craig S. 

438 Pleasant Street 
Weymouth, MA 02190 

Hanagan, Carol 

38 Lafayette Street 
Arlington, MA 02174 

Hanrahan, Charlotte 

55 Park Avenue West 
South Weymouth, MA 02190 

Harding, Dianne 

162 Metacomet Avenue 
Swansea, MA 02777 

Harrington, Christine 

21 Elm Street 
Charleston, MA 02129 

Harrison-Cook, Sarah 

396 Wareham Street 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Hartley, Kathleen 

447 Franklin Street 
Wrentham, MA 02093 

Heraty, Sharon 

48 Jersey Avenue 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Heydt, William 

2 Francis Street 
Franklin, MA 03235 

Higgins, MarylOu 

645 South Avenue 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Hilditch, Nanci 

108 East Main Street 
Hopkinton, MA 01748 

Humphreys, Susan 

2 Lakeview Avenue 
Wakefield, MA 01880 

Hurley, Diane 

44 Butler Road 

East Weymouth, MA 02189 

Hurwitz, Susan 

19 Prospect Avenue 
Randolph, MA 02308 



248 



Senior Directory 



Hyland, Brenda 

34 Richard Road 
Swansea, MA 02777 

lannacchero, Cara 

736 Pearl Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Ingemi, Christine 

34 Turner Road 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Jackman, Julie 

35 Lantern Lane 
Mansfield, MA 02048 

Jackson, Joanne 

35 Alfred Street 
Fall River, MA 02721 

Jakub, Susan 

23 Friend Street 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Jenkins, Lynn A. 

733 Pleasant Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Jenny, Brian 

82 S. Washington Street 
Norton, MA 02766 

Kardoose, Karen 

50 Mayflower Circle 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Karparis, Andrew 

P.O. Box 673 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

Katilus, Bob 

60 Stevens Drive 
Holbrook, MA 02343 

Kaufman, Gary M. 

60 Powell Street 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Kelly, Stephen J. 

53 Tyler Street 

North Quincy, MA 02171 

Kenney, Shannon E. 

31 Gardner Avenue 

South Attleboro, MA 02703 

Kiernan, Craig 

31 Carver Street 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Kiff, Noreen 

53 Stanley Street 
Attleboro Falls, MA 02763 

Killory, Ann 



129 Winnifred Road 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Kincaid, Kerri 

224 Garfield Avenue 
Revere, MA 02151 

King, Robert E. 

11 East State Street 

East Wareham, MA 02538 

Kirby, Donna 

27 Sycamore Street 
Fairhaven, MA 02179 

Kirker, Susan 

41 Arlington Street 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Kolb, Lance 

15 Summit Avenue 
Tappan, NY 10983 

Krovitz, Edward 

47 Edgehill Road 
Winthrop, MA 02152 

LaBelle, Gerald 

12 Gilman Street 
Holyoke, MA 01046 

LaFreniere, Terri 

14 Sunnyside Road 
Woburn, MA 01801 

Lagadinos, Ethel 

34 Mohawk Road 
Canton, MA 02021 

Landsberger, Curtis J. 

278 Plymouth Ave. 
East Warren, MA 02538 

Laurino, Lisa 

147 Plain Street 
Rehoboth, MA 02769 

LaVigne, Jeannine 

737 Tarklin Hill Road 
New Bedford, MA 02745 

Lawrence, Melissa 

71 Briar wood Road 
Brain tree, MA 02184 

Leahy, John 

10 Hillsdale Road 
Holbrook, MA 02343 

Leal, Susan 

39 Brewster Lane 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

LeBlanc, Ted 

6 Harvard Street 





249 



Senior Directory 




Plain ville, MA 02762 

Leger, Susan 

P.O. Box 659 
Franklin, MA 02038 

Lelliott, Geoffrey 

311 North Franklin Street 
Holbrook, MA 02343 

LeMay, Robert D. 

86 James Circle 
Mashpee, MA 02649 

Leo, Nilde 

149 Vine Street 
Everett, MA 02149 

Leonard, Cynthia 

51 Zoar Avenue 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Lifrieri, Jeannine 

34 Myrtle Street 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Liolios, Karen 

88 Frankton Avenue 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Litchfield, Allan 

25 King Crest Terrace 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Loonie, James 

80 Dartmouth Terrace 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Loranger, Catherine 

40 Mason Road 

East Freetown, MA 02177 

Louzan, Pete 

52 Elm Road 

South Weymouth, MA 09190 

Lumsden, Lynn 

8 Croydon Road 
Framingham, MA 01701 

Lydiard, Alan M. 

92 Boston Rock Road 
Melrose, MA 02176 

Lydon, Margaret 

3 Purchase Street 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Lynne, Thomas 

113 Randall Street 
North Easton, MA 02356 

MacDonald, Scott 

34 Farnham Road 
Stoughton, MA 02070 



MacGavin, Helen 

530 Pleasant Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

Machado, Lisa 

537 South Street 
Somerset, MA 02726 

MacLellan, Heather 

223 High Street 
Hanson, MA 02341 

MacLeod, Jane 

15 Bloomfield Street 
North Quincy, MA 02171 

MacPhadden, Allison 

17 Pine Grove Road 
Hingham, MA 02043 

MacPherson, Daniel 

83 Bridge Street 

East Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Madden, Andrew 

28 Silverlake Avenue 
Newton, MA 02158 

Magner, Michelle 

37 Canterbury Drive 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Malliaroudakis, Claire 

17 Frontcourt Road 
Canton, MA 02021 

Mandeville, Donald 

5 Water Street 
Spencer, MA 01562 

Manley, Mary Anne 

4 Chipaway Lane 

East Freetown, MA 02717 

Marques, Evelyn 

58 Newcombe Street 
New Bedford, MA 02746 

Marsiglia, Peter 

10 Sylvester Road 
Dorchester, MA 02122 

Martin, Mary 

105 Lorri Lane 

East Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Martin, Priscilla 

P.O. Box 2093 

Ocean Bluff, MA 02065 

Mason, Stephanie 

1 1 Spooner Street 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Massari, James 



250 



Senior Directory 



^ 



65 Greening Avenue 
Pittsfield, MA 01201 

Mate, Jeffrey 

12 Stevens Place 
Melrose, MA 02176 

Maziya, Nonnie 

27 Springhill Ave, Apt. 2 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

McCallum, David 

150 Cliff Drive 

North Attleboro, MA 02760 

McClentic, Mary 

19 Bradley Park Drive 
Hingham, MA 02043 

McCormack, Eric 

480 Gorwin Drive 
Hanson, MA 02341 

McCormack, Michelle 

848 Hanover Street 
Hanover, MA 02339 

McCurry, Susan 

3401 Riverside Avenue 
Somerset, MA 00272 

McElroy, Donna 

317 Woodland Drive 
Hanover, MA 02339 

McFarlane, Andrea 

187 Ames Street 
Brockton, MA 02402 

McGaughey, Shaun 

47 Meadow view Drive 
Lowell, MA 01854 

McLaughlin, Amy 

38 Clark Road 
Andover, MA 01810 

McLean, John 

33 Ithaca Road 
Brockton, MA 02402 

McManus, Paula 

50 Caldwell Street 

North Weymouth, MA 02191 

McNeil, Paula 

18 Sherman Street 
Natick, MA 01760 

McQuade, Larry 

121 Washington Street 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Merigo, Cynthia 

152 Pleasant Bay Road 



Harwich, MA 02645 

Miserandino, Mandy 

124 Franklin Street 
Duxbury, MA 02332 

Mitchell, Diana 

164 Annabell Point Road 
Centerville, MA 02632 

Molitoris, Mike 

5 Cajun Court 
Bedford, NH 03102 

Monahan, Diane 

163 Beach Street 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Moniz, Kerran 

28 Smith Street 
Fairhaven, MA 02719 

Monruskin, Calma 

23 Elm Street 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Montone, Shelly 

25 Pearl Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

Moore, Carla 

41 Hartshorn Street 

West Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Moore, Janet 

172 Pleasant Street 
Upton, MA 01568 

Moore, Richard 

67 South Wood worth Drive 
Norwell, MA 02061 

Mortensen, Mary 

56 Lathrop Road 
Sagamore Beach, MA 02562 

Moxley, Susan 

16 West Vaughn 
Lake view, MA 02347 

Mucci, Joseph 

34 Berlin Street 
Quincy, MA 02170 

Mucci, Wendy 

109 Torry Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Mulcahy, Robert 

69 Hertwick Street 
Springfield, MA 01108 

Mullen, Anne 

44 Bradle Road 
Milton, MA 02186 




251 



Senior Directory 




Murphy, Michelle 

4 Heatherwood Avenue 
New Hartford, NY 13413 

Naeglin, Elaine 

93 Captains Row 
Mashpee, MA 02649 

Nedzweckas, Shelley 

P.O. Box 842 
Southbridge, MA 01550 

Needs, Laurie 

21 Ramblewood Drive 
Raynham, MA 02760 

Negrucci, Leah 

35 Hayes Avenue 
Feeding Hills, MA 01030 

O'Brien, Daniel 

10 Howland Street 
Brockton, MA 02402 

O'Hara, Thomas 

90 Perch Pond Circle 
Falmouth, MA 02540 

O'Neil, Karyn 

42 South Meadow Road 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

O'Rourke, Maryellen 

18 North Street 
Newton Center, MA 02159 

Ogren, Danielle 

511 Orchard Street 
Raynham, MA 00000 

Oliveira, Carlos 

26 Green Drive 

North Darthmouth, MA 02747 

Onos, Erin 

36 Elmwood Circle 
Peabody, MA 01960 

Orlando, Rose 

82 Beal Avenue 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Pappalardo, Julia T. 

38 Grandview Drive 
Westfield, MA 01085 

Paquin, Mark 

10 Oak Street 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Parsley, Barbara 

19 Tinson Road 

West Quincy, MA 02169 

Parsons, Jeffrey 



75 North Hampton Street 
East Hampton, MA 01027 

Patota, Christopher 

I Susan Street 
Swansea, MA 02777 

Patterson, Mark 

1221 Main Street 
Mansfield, MA 02050 

Pendleton, Stacey 

871 East Washington Street 
Hanson, MA 02341 

Penza, David 

17 Village Street 
Medway, MA 02053 

Pereira, Kathy 

35 Jaffrey Street 
Swansea, MA 02777 

Perry, Denise 

42 Mountainview Road 
Weymouth, MA 02189 

Perry, Juliana 

15 Rock Street 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Peterson, Beverly 

I I Booth Street 

South Attleboro, MA 02703 

Petrell, Carolyn V. 

70 Warren Avenue 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Pettit, Ronald B., Jr. 

49 Midland Street 
Worcester, MA 01602 

Phelps, John 

970 Warren Avenue 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Philpott, Timothy 

215 Hespherus Avenue 
Gloucester, MA 01930 

Pieroni, Stephen 

12 Surry Lane 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Pinviotta, Barbara 

3 Southgate Road 
Franklin, MA 02038 

Poirier, John 

29 Bradford Street 

North Andover, MA 01845 

Polvinen, Arlene 

P.O. Box 994 



252 



Senior Directory 



Lakeville, MA 02347 

Pongratz, Marianne 

24 Plain Street 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Poudrier, Todd 

94 Oak Street 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Powers, Nancy 

25 West Street 
Medfield, MA 02052 

Powers, Timothy 

11 Kays Road 
Stoneham, MA 02180 

Proffetty, Marianne 

71 Austin Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

Promponas, Nicholas 

40 Clement Avenue 
West Roxbury, MA 02132 

Quinn, Joseph 

60 Winslow Road 
Belmont, MA 02178 

Rando, Manuela R. 

48 Dover Street 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Raymond, Susan 

7 Anita Road 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Rayner, Thomas 

473 Hartford Avenue 
Bellingham, MA 02019 

Reardon, Stephen 

151 Arnold Street 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Ritucci, Laura 

158 Boylston Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Rocharz, Patricia 

96 Old Center Street 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Rogers, Cheryl 

103 Highland Street 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Ronan, Lisa 

130 Canal Street, Apt. 202 
Fall River, MA 02721 

Rose, Gary 

6 Sunset Lane 
Fairhaven, MA 02719 



Rousseau, Kevin 

30 Dewolf Street 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Ruppenthal, Beth 

8 Elmcrest Circle 
Walpole, MA 02081 

Saba, Renee 

8 Millbrook Avenue 
Walpole, MA 02081 

Saccocia, Gaye 

680 Crescent Street 

East Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Safley, Alisa 

36 Wigglesworth Street 
Maiden, MA 02148 

Saikali, Hisham 

187 Thomas Street 
Fall River, MA 02723 

Sannella, John 

74 Pine Street 
Stoneham, MA 02180 

Santos, Tracy 

546 Freelove Street 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Sarruda, Lori 

6 Bel Air Road 
Hingham, MA 02403 

Savery, Robert 

819 Country Street 54C 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Sawyer, Kevin 

254 South Street 

West Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Scarborough, Jodi 

24 Wentworth Road 
Melrose, MA 02176 

Schindler, Susan 

14 Lyndon Road 
Sharon, MA 02067 

Scott, Jennifer 

P.O. Box 369 

East Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Scott, Matthew 

417 North Main Street 
Raynham, MA 02767 

Seeley, Jeffrey 

43 Clarence Avenue 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Sekelsky, Matthew 




253 



Senior Directory 




25 Parkland Road 
Statford, CT 06497 

Sheehan, Mary K. 

18 Oceanfront 
Humarock, MA 02047 

Shine, Karen 

1220 Stoneyhill Road 
Wilbraham, MA 01095 

Shulman, Jodi 

284 St. Nicholas Avenue 
Worcester, MA 01606 

Skilton, Carolyn 

28 Cottage Lane 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Smalley, Christopher 

144 Atkinson Drive 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Smith, David A. 

1711 Liberty Street 
Brain tree, MA 02184 

Smith, Janine 

31 Worcester Street 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Smith, Martha 

66 Rose Hill Way 
Waltham, MA 02154 

Smith, Stacey 

21 John Street 
Chelsea, MA 02150 

Smith, William C. 

34 Fitzpatrick Avenue 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Sopp, Edwin 

8 Pinhurst Avenue 
Beverly, MA 01915 

Souza, Anne 

P.O. Box 335 

West Yarmouth, MA 02673 

Spencer, Shawn P. 

P.O. Box 224 

Scituate, MA 02066 

Spillane, Linda 

7 Hunters Road, Box 235 
Sagamore Beach, MA 02562 

Spruce, Jennifer 

92 Leroy Drive 
Pittsfield,MA 01201 

Stachowiak, John 

1529 Hanover Street 



Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 

Stanford, Ellen J. 

4 Robert Lane 
Lawrence, MA 01843 

Stetson, Marcia 

102 East Street 
Sharon, MA 02067 

Stokinger, Peter 

22 Hersey Avenue 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Strachoff, Gregory 

79.5 West Britannia Street 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Sturgis, Heidi 

38 Walker Street 
Quincy, MA 02171 

Sullivan, Cathy 

32 Union Street 
Fairhaven, MA 02719 

Sullivan, Christine 

68 Mill River Drive 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Swain, Kerri Ann 

20 Perry Road 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Swartz, Barbara J. 

148 Judson Street 
Rayham, MA 02767 

Sweeny, Kimberely 

135 Fort Avenue 
Salem, MA 01970 

Szymanczyk, Michelle 

43 Bishop Road 
Wollaston, MA 02170 

Taylor, Patricia 

113 Union Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Tchorz, David 

670 Dalton Division Road 
Pittsfield, MA 01020 

Teller, Janice 

57 Village Street 

South Easton, MA 02375 

Thompson, Lisa 

118 Colwell Drive 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Tiberi, Nancy 

53 Grove Street 
Millis, MA 02054 



254 



Senior Directory 



Tobey, Laura 

298 East Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Tobin, Terry 

16 Clifton Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Travers, Michael 

15 Fourth Avenue 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Traynor, Jamie 

Cresent Street 
Plympton, MA 02367 

Urbatti, Robin 

10 Kimball Beach Road 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Valin, Jeffrey 

35 Benton Road 
Belmont, MA 02178 

Vedovelli, Christine 

80 Norman Street 
Springfield, MA 01104 

Vickery, Thomas A. 

233 Camp Street 
Barre, VT 05641 

Vieira, Laurine 

139 Bryant Street 
Berkley, MA 02779 

Viveiros, Sharon 

P.O. Box 68 

East Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Volpe, Michelle 

511 Orchard Street 
Raynham, MA 00000 

yValdron, Richard J. 

.9 Tadmuck Road 
Chelmsford, MA 01824 

Wallace, Michael 

750 East Third Street 
South Boston, MA 02127 

Walsh, David 

14 Oakwood Avenue 
Whitman, MA 02328 

Walsh, Kathleen 

63 Livoli Avenue 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Ward, Edmund 

19 Lydon Lane 
Kingston, MA 02364 

Ward, Sally 



451 Lincoln Street 
Abington, MA 02351 

Warren, Brian A. 

48 H Street 
Hull, MA 02045 

Watson, Cathy 

48 Parker Street 
Norwell, MA 02061 

Waugh, Jane 

33 Wellington Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Welch, Bethanne 

16 Evergreen Road 
Lowell, MA 01852 

Welch, Linda 

11 Jackson Street 
Marshfield, MA 02050 

Westwood, Susan 

768 High Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Whelan, Michael 

39 Stonewood Lane 
Lynn, MA 01904 

White, Sandra 

101 Jacob Street 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Whitehead, Christine 

50 Intervale Road 
Weymouth, MA 02189 

Wilcox, Brendan 

418 Woodward Street 
Newton, MA 02168 

Woolf, Michelle 

12 Cross Street, Apt. 6 
Westboro, MA 01581 

Wunschel, Michelle 

42 Golf Street 

North Datmouth, MA 02747 

Yeshulas, Debra 

30 Palmer Street 
Brocktoii, MA 02401 

Zakujp; Lynne 

18 Rt)semount Avenue 
Vyiltham, MA 02154 

/^izzo, Charles 

82 Fuller Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 




255 




COriQRATULATIONS TO 
THE CLASS OF 1989! 



FROM THE 1989 YEARBOOK 



THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES! 



256 



f 



ONE LAST 



K. 




Of Boyden HaU 
And the Memories 
that We've Shared. 



257 



A FINAL FAREWELL 



Editor In Chief 

Ronald B. Pettit Jr. 

Managing Editor 

Paul Coumoyer 

Pliotography Editors 

Lisa Marchterre, Fall 
Edmund Wise, Spring 

Student Life Editor 

Nanci Burgio 

Residences Editor 

Jossett J. Jones 

Academics Editor 

Ron Pettit 

Organizations Editor 

Leighann McGovem 

Greelcs Editor 

Pamela Grimes 

Sports Editor 

Paul Coumoyer 

Senior Section Editor 

Nanci Burgio 

Directory Editors 

Paul Coumoyer 
Ron Pettit 

Closing Editor 

Ron Pettit 

Advisor 

Phil A. Conroy 

Staff 

Oguz Aglamaz, Valerie Andrade, 
Neil Bums, Bridget Chin, Kathy 
Counter, Tracey DeMaio, Berna- 
dette Hemandez, Ramona LeClair, 
Christine Lewinsky, Joe Mucci, 
Laurie O'Brien, Steve McPhee, Ed 
Ward, Deb Willis. 




THiS IS iT. THIS IS THE LAST BOOK. THIS IS 
THE END OF FOUR YEARS I'VE SPENT AS EDITOR 
OF THE YEARBOOK. I CAN'T BELIEVE IT'S 
FINALLY OVER. IT'S HARD TO BEGIN WRITING 
THIS LETTER. YOU SEE, EVERY TIME I HAVE 
WRIHEN A FAREWELL LETTER, I'VE KNOWN 
I'LL BE BACK NEXT YEAR. BUT THIS YEAR IS 
DIFFERENT BECAUSE I KNOW I WON'T BE BACK. 
THIS WILL BE MY FINAL FAREWELL. . . 



I don't know where to begin. I guess now 
is a good as any place to start. Believe it 
or it it's actually September as I am writ- 
ing this. I can't believe the book hasn't 
been done until now. You see, when I 
finish writing this letter, the book is fin- 
ished. So if I'm writing this in Septem- 
ber, that means the books wasn't fin- 
ished until now. Which is ridiculous 
because it should have been done soon- 
er. 

It happened again. After the initial 
msh of lots of Yearbookers, a few people 
(like four or five) and I are always left to 
work hard all year, especially in the 
spring semester. Then the last day of 
school comes out of nowhere and every- 
one deserts me, leaving me with a pile of 



unfinished pages sitting in my room at 
home. 

It wasn't supposed to happen this year 
because I knew I was graduating (on- 
time in fours years, if you can believe it). 
I wasn't going to have this Yearbok 
headache all summer, if I could help it. 
But it happened again. 

So I finish the book in September as 
usual and the Yearbooks will come out 
late in January, just like they did last 
year. Because this year I'm not in Bridge- 
water I won't get screamed at (but Paul 
and the Alumni Office will) with 
"WHERE MY YEARBOOK, GOD 
DAMN IT!?!" They'll be told "Soon", 
like last year, and they'll ask, "Why 
aren't they here now? I graduated in 



258 



FROM RON PETTIT 



May." "Because Ron was late again/' 

fomes the answer. 
This is the reason why I'm writing. I 
don't want my tenure as Yearbook Editor 
to be solely remembered that I came out 
with late books every year. Of course, I 
did came out with late books; I'm not 
arguing that. 

But, I also hope that my tenure will be 
remembered that I came out with really 
exciting and colorful books. Every year 
my goal was to put together a book that 
be interesting for its readers. My main 
concern was about the quality of the 
books itself, and the on-time delivery 
was secondary. 

To say I wasn't concerned about get- 
ting the book on time is totally wrong. 
The fact is that staff support is essential 
to having a book out on time. In my four 
years, I have never had an adequate 
number of staff working to put out the 
yearbook. In fact, after March/ April, the 
staff numbering at least five to ten peo- 
ple reduces down to one — me. 

Somehow, I put up with all of this and 
shoulder the responsibility of completing 
a huge majority of the book by myself. 
Now, no one can understand, unless 
they have been an Editor or on a Year- 
book staff, about all the stuff you have 
go through to put together a Yearbook. It 
takes a lot of work. And when one per- 
son is doing all of it — some things just 
take second place, like on-time delivery. 

My advice to people who want an on- 
time delivery of a yearbook is to either 
accept an inferior quality book or GET 
INVOLVED on the Yearbook and make 
it a quality and on-time book. One per- 
son or even five or ten people is not 



going to cut it. Take a look at the four 
books I've done. Every single one of 
them is a great book, done by a few 
people — and all of them late. It takes a 
lot of people — tons of them — and they 
all have to be hard working and ded- 
icated — make an exciting and on-time 
book. 

My legacy to you is the four fantastic 
looking books that I have done and 
hopefully they will inspire you to do just 
as great or perhaps greater than my 
books. Your legacy then will be to de- 
liver a quality book as well as an on-time 
book. 

Now, my job as Yearbook Editor is 
finally over. I never have to touch an- 
other layout sheet "What? I have to 
come up with another one of my brillant 
designs?", take another call — "Where's 
my yearbook?!?!", and take another pic- 
ture "I want only pretty girls in my year- 
book. That's why I want to take your 
picture". 

I'm glad I don't have to do it again. 
And again. And again. And again. (Four 
times, you get the idea). But, I'll certainly 
miss the money, the power, and the 
magic of it all. 

Because, the magic is in the memories 
that are rekindled when someone opens 
a yearbook — a yearbook that I helped 
to create. And this is the part I'll miss — 
I'll miss the creating that special magic 
for my friends. 

And on that note, I'll say ... for for- 
ever . . . 



SO LONG, FAREWELL, I HATE TO SAY GOODBYE. 
SO LONG, FAREWELL GOOD NIGHT. 

THE SOUND OF MUSIC 




KUDOS. . . 
This Yearbook would not have been 
completed without the Ideas, sugges- 
tions, and help from many people. 
Without them this Yearbook would 
have never been published. 

To the Alumni Office — Shirley, 
Majorie, Jane, and Susan. Special Ku- 
dos to Mary ("Ronnie, how about an- 
other back massage?"), Kim ("Who 
can know?"), Ashley ("I'm so disap- 
pointed In youl") and Phil ("What 
now?") for being such super friends 
this past year. I'm going to miss you 
all so much. 

To Bob, Dan, and Isabelle at Mc- 
Grath's Studio for coming up with 
some of the best photography we've 
had in years. Thanks for all your help. 

To Conrad, Karen and Sonia at Tay- 
lor Publishing Company for their ded- 
icated efforts for the past three years. 
It has been a pleasure working with 
such understanding and helpful people 
like you. You helped to make it easier 
for me to be a Yearbook Editor. 

To Leighann for helping us by doing 
her share and at a difficult time do 
someone else's work when we-know- 
who-resigned. 

To Paul for showing up mid-year to 
become, of all things, Managing Ed- 
itor. For the first time in four years, I 
found someone who had the same 
passion and dedication to the Year- 
book as I had. Because of his hard 
work last year, I appointed him as next 
year's Editor. Congratulations, Paul! I 
know you will do a good job, and I wish 
you good luck next year! 

To Beth and Barbara for being my 
best friends, if only miles away. 

To my Mom and my brother Brian 
for their love and support. 



259 




BRIDGEWATER STATE COLlIge 



AS 1 M15S 
d ANNUAL 

[tudent 
^hibition 

' 1ST-27TH 



RAGMENTS 

BY 
JACKIE 
LIPSKY 

MAY 2-31 

CAMPUS 
CENTER 





or over 260 pages you have seen "What's New" at Bridgewater State College ir\ 
1989. Many new and different things happened this year, and some members of 
the college community accepted the postitive changes and others protested the 
not-so-positive ones. It was certainly not a dull year as college community 
members seemed to have regained its passion of getting involved and making its 
their voices heard. It was a year of students, faculty, and administrators making 
their tracks — a definite impression — on Bridgewater State College. 



260 



CLOSING 




Ron Pettit 

Closing Editor 









261 




CONGRATULATIONS! 

Carol Furr, chairperson of the college Board of 
Trustees takes a moment to congratulate a member 
of the graduating Class of 1989 on May 27. 



WITH ONLY DAYS AWAY 

until graduation, these seniors celebrate their last 
days as "seniors" at Senior Night at the Rat. Senior 
Night at the Rat was part of the action packed 
Senior Week activities. 

IT WAS A "BLACK" TIE 

affair at the Spring Ball held on the last of classes at 
the Sheraton-Tara Braintree. The Spring Ball was 
the biggest social event of the year. 

LOOKING AHEAD 

a Class of 1989 graduate. Barbie Daniels, thinks of 
the new and different changes that lie ahead for her 
as she begins the next phase of her life beyond 
Bridgewater. 




262 




It's hard to sum up what happened in 1989 and 
significance of it all. It seemed that so many 
changes — new and different — took place in 
areas such as policies, personnel, and especially 
attitudes. No where in recent history has so much 
change happened in one year. 

A key change that occured in 1989 was the change 
in attitude. In recent years, students' attitude was 
largely apathetic. That changed as the "deficit 
assessment fee" crisis came about. Students no longer 
stood idly by, but took action and voiced their 
opinions about issues that concerned them. 

Administration took a new notice to the collective 
voice of the students, and both students and the 
administration had a new basis for a meaningful 
dialogue. A dialogue that would take evey one's 
concerns and needs into consideration and help create 
mutually agreeable solutions. 

When we look back on 1989, we can see that all 
the changes helped to create a "new and different" 
Bridgewater State College; a Bridgewater State 
College that can move forward into the future with 
purpose and success. 



263 




Looking back on 1989, we can see a "new and 
different" Bridgewater State College emerging as 
changes were made in policies, personnel, physical 
surroundings, and especially attitudes. As a result of 
these changes, the Bridgewater State College can move ahead 
into the future with purpose and success. 



264 




COLOPHON 



^ 
^ 



volume 91 of iheursae masons 
Yearbook of Bridgewater State College 
was printed by Taylor Publishing 
Company of Dallas, Texas. Company 
representative was Conrad Schmidt and 
special computer representative was 
Karen Devitt. 

PRODUCTION INFORMATION 

All copy was submitted by computer 
disk, using Taylor's exclusive yearbook 
preparation software, TypeVision. 
Under a multi-deadline system, pages 
for each deadline were sent to Talyor's 
plant in Dallas, Texas, where negatives 
were made. Upon completion of 16- 
page signatures at Dallas, pages were 
then printed at Taylor's Malvern, 
Pennsylvania plant. Final press run was 
650 copies. 

COLOR AND SPOT COLOR 

Of the 264 pages using 80 lb. enamel 
paper, 47 pages were printed using the 
state of the art four-color laser scanning 
process. Thirteen (13) pages in the 
Dedication and Opening sections were 
printed with one additional spot color 
teal #19. 

COVER AND ENDSHEET SPECIFICATIONS 

The cover is. The front and back 
endsheets utilized two different layout 
designs and were printed with black 
and maroon #34 ink. 



Cover concept created by Ron Pettit '89 
and Paul Cournoyer '91. Endsheet, 
Opening, Closing and Divider concepts 
created by Ron Pettit '89. 

TYPEFACES 

The primary typeface utilized for body 
copy throughout the entire yearbook 
was Malibu, a type similar to Palatino 
which had been utilized for the past 
three years. 

Primary headline typefaces for Cover, 
Title Page, Dedication, Opening, 
Dividers, Closing is Nouveau Bold and 
its variations. 

Other sections utilized different 
typefaces for headlines and special 
applications. The Student Life Section 
used Hanover for headlines and Geneva 
Bold for captions. Residences Section 
used Chancery Bold for headlines and 
Chancery Italic for subheadlines. 

The following sections used different 
typefaces for their headlines and 
subheadlines: Academics Section used 
Korinna and Korinna Bold. 
Organizations Section used Geneva 
Outline and Geneva Bold. Greek 
Section used Avant Garde. Sports 
Section used Pyramid Bold. 

ORDERING INFORMATION 

Members of the graduating Class of 



1989 received a copy free, provided 
that they reserved a copy during 
senior year. Underclassmen and 
other members of college community 
were charged $10.00 per copy. 
Mailing fee, name on cover, and 
plastic protective cover were optional 
items that could be ordered. 

SENIOR PORTRAITS 

Color Senior Portraits were taken by 
McGrath's Studio of Brockton, 
Massachusetts — the official 
Yearbook photographer. Seniors 
wishing to be included in the 
Yearbook were required to have their 
portrait taken by McGrath's Studio; 
no portraits from other studios were 
accepted. The policy was instituted to 
help improve the consistency and 
quality of the Senior Portraits to be 
printed in color in the yearbook. 



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